Tips/advice for installing compressor hard line?

Discussion in 'Garages, Workshops & Tools' started by 76_TypeLT, May 26, 2014.

  1. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    6,370
    129
    Jul 26, 2008
    Houston, TX
    I am not sure if I am using the right name, but I want to run a hard line between my 60 gal compressor and the filter I am going to use. I will be using a Quincy that has max PSI of 175 and 15.2 CFM @ 175 PSI.

    The filter manufacturer states I need to have at least 25' of line between the compressor and the filter. So I am going to run something along my back wall and build in a quick disconnect so I can move the compressor (it will be on a mobile base).

    Should I use copper or galvanized? Copper is pricier so not sure if it's worth the extra cost.

    What can I use for the flex connection between the compressor and the hard line? Hydraulic hose?

    Any other tips/advice for this kind of project?
     
  2. iraqivet

    iraqivet Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    379
    6
    Nov 7, 2012
    Hobart, Indiana
    Compressor line

    I ran 3/4 HVPC from the compressor line (Compressor is in outside shed, 1/2" Galvanized pipe inside 1" Gray PVC buried) to my regulator / filter. No problems even on warmer / hot days. A lot of people may say that HVPC should not be used for air Line. I've had no problems, but then again I'm not running it 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, or how a shop would during the week. My compressor is rated to 140 PSI and I have it dialed down to 90 PSI with a regulator / drain just off the tank before it reaches the regulator / filter for my spray guns. I use a 25' air line from the regulator / filter with a disposable filter on the spray gun. Since I use HVLP equipment I set the regulator to 30 PSI. (A little on the high side recommendations, but was told to use it by a friend that has painted cars for over 30 years). I also us the compressor for air tools and the blast cabinet. No problems with the HPVC lines.
     
  3. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    6,370
    129
    Jul 26, 2008
    Houston, TX
    Thanks for the reply. I should be able to run all copper/steel lines since my garage is small. I will likely have to take the line down and back up to get the 25'+ length required.
     
  4. Batman

    Batman Administrator Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

    8,673
    6
    Dec 13, 1999
    Mission Viejo, CA, USA
    My $.02.....

    While galvanized may be cheaper, the fact that you have to have the ends threaded for every connector, angle, tee, etc. may make it more of a PITA than the money you're saving. And considering that unless you're running a refrigerated dryer before anything pipe comes in contact with the air, you've got a setup that WILL get moisture in there and eventually rust and corrode the pipes. There's a reason they use copper for plumbing and don't really use galvanized anymore.

    As for using PVC or other plastic piping, while I know many have had good luck with it, the bottom line is that if it grenades because the Chinese plant where it was made had a bubble in the plastic the day yours was made you're going to have a REALLY bad day if you're in the shop with it. Plastic doesn't show up on an X-ray, so the only way to find all the shards is probing and hoping. Not my idea of fun.
     
  5. clay's70

    clay's70 Moderator Lifetime Gold Member

    How I did my 25 feet.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  6. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    6,370
    129
    Jul 26, 2008
    Houston, TX
    Thanks guys. Clay, I will check the pics when I am at home tonight.

    I agree re: not using PVC. I am not running a long line so I can use metal, but even then I have read that PVC is not suitable for this application. I also tend to agree with using copper over steel for the corrosion aspect. Copper appears to be the best way to do it.
     
  7. Goodwrench1965

    Goodwrench1965 Veteran Member

    831
    13
    Apr 23, 2010
    Charlotte NC
    I like the hard lines the guy put in photo. I say use black iron pipe from hardware stores. Most stores will cut to lenth and thread for free. I always use 1/2" I think. I'm sure 3/4 might be recomended but only needed for super high demand for air I doubt you will ever need. Hard pipe will last a lifetime if you keep a coat off paint on outside if it starts to rust. Coorosion on inside will not be a problem becuase you bleed the system of pressure occaisionally or each day and there is a little oil in the air that gets by the rings in the compressor that will prevent rust. With rigid lines there is a good safety factor and you can push hose quick connects and not have pipe moving or breaking. You can mount hose reals or yank on hose no problems. Quick connects are nice but if there are tools you plan on using all the time save the expense and put a iron T to a barbed fitting and rubber hose to barbed fitting hose clamped straigt to the tool. You can have several lots cheaper than quick connect and that won't leak air and need replaced all the time. I have run and been adding on my hard lines all over shop. I invested in pipe thread tool so I can thread my own ends. YOu can weld up header fittings too for lots of tools. Put a shut off at least one between compressor and line. You should plan on investing in two decent pipe/ monkey wrenches and a decent can of pipe thread sealant. Do Black iron best product for money and last for ever.
     
  8. Zstar

    Zstar Veteran Member

    871
    166
    Mar 23, 2014
    Ocala, Florida
    You may want to look at GARAGEPAK.COM. They have really good products at reasonable prices and are much easier to work with than copper or steel.
     
  9. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    6,370
    129
    Jul 26, 2008
    Houston, TX

Share This Page