TIG vs MIG welding opinions for beginner

Discussion in 'Garages, Workshops & Tools' started by Aceshigh, Feb 1, 2010.

TIG or MIG For a beginner ??

Poll closed Feb 22, 2010.
  1. TIG

    5 vote(s)
    12.5%
  2. MIG

    35 vote(s)
    87.5%
  1. night rider

    night rider Veteran Member

    6,401
    3
    Aug 6, 2002
    Bremen, Ga
    Aces I wouldnt be scared of the ar/co2 gas. It's bad but not as bad as it sounds

    Sure if you breath alot of it in, it will kill, by suffocating you.

    Now truthfully no hobby welder will ever do enough welding at one time for that to happen.

    The smoke will get to you before the gas does.

    On a guess I would say it would take a couple hours straight of breathing in the gas to hurt/kill you.

    Most of us hobby welders will weld for a couple of min, then stop, chec work, walk away, check fit, etc

    I have welded ALOT since getting my mig and I think the longest welding I have done at one time was maybe 5 min straight w/o stopping

    I welded for probbly 5 hours on my roll cage but it was a weld around this bar joint, stop, move, get were I could get at the next joint, weld it, stop, move, weld next joint..

    Get out of car, walk around to other side or front, lay down, weld, stop, etc
     
  2. BusDriver

    BusDriver Veteran Member

    1,358
    0
    Apr 28, 2004
    Charlotte, NC
    NR is right, when your doing car stuff you're doing tacks... so you weld for 1/4 of a sec, then move, tack, move, tack....

    I set my gas at ~20CFH... That's 20 cubic feet of gas, per HOUR... And that's only arc time, so the ammount of gas that comes out during that tack weld is miniscule.

    Plus, as said, it's the smoke or zinc fumes (galvanized) that are bad, as long as you have ventilation but theres not a fan blowing ON you to disturb the sheild it's fine for regular steel, I'd consider a breather for galvanized due to the serious fumes...
     
  3. Teamchevy

    Teamchevy Veteran Member Gold Member

    1,629
    0
    Aug 31, 2008
    Peterborough, Ontario
    Aces,

    Kamikaze covers quite a bit of it right there. I took two courses before starting up my own machine. First was Oxy/Acetylene & Stick welding which covered all of the safety aspects and practice with both. Second was MIG, which allowed the student to learn & practice pretty much everthing except overhead position, which you learn after when you're working upside down under your car ;) . I bought a Lincoln 110V, on sale, and tried just flux core, but it was too smokey and didn't leave the clean weld like I was using at school, they had gas. Bought a tank @ TSC of C25, mix of carbon dioxide and argon, and the welds look great! Personally, I would have bought a 220V, which I looking to do this summer or fall, so I can take on some bigger welding projects and maybe buy an Aluminun spool gun. I wanted to take TIG, but the equipment was out of my price range at the time. We did get a chance to try it in class and it reminded me of Oxy/Acetylene. It's used at work and gives a real clean presentation weld as well as structure, but I think with practice, the same can be done with MIG.

    Good luck!

    Dave
    :bowtie:
     
  4. 79camaro2001

    79camaro2001 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    4,761
    0
    May 4, 2003
    Monroeville, PA
    Ace, if you are really worried about the gas then leave the garage door open about a foot or so to let air in and out. This way the heavy gas will go outside and disappear. Most of the time when you are in a closed in space you are suppose to wear artificial air supply equipment due to the possible gases being trapped in them. The guy welding on the railroad tank probably should have been wearing the gear. I know in the oil field you have to follow a strict guideline before someone enter a confined area.

    Also galvanized steel is bad mojo when welding or burning. Best for you to never mess with anything galvanized.

    Also most of the time I never seen people clean the section with anything chemical, usually they take a wire wheel to it if it's thick metal, or sand disc to clean the surface of rust and then weld it.

    Biggest thing you need to worry about is sparks. It will fly and it will catch stuff on fire every so often. Sometime that smoke is you that's on fire. So keep a good size towel around to put out small fire and a fire extinguisher for bigger fire. No welding takes place around the yard without a fire Extinguisher within 5 ft of the work source.
     
  5. 79camaro2001

    79camaro2001 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    4,761
    0
    May 4, 2003
    Monroeville, PA
    This is what's being welded on in the yard I'm working at now.

    [​IMG]

    Right now it's a bunch of repair works and rebuild works due to upgrading equipments and metal being subjected to extreme loads and environment.
     
  6. Teamchevy

    Teamchevy Veteran Member Gold Member

    1,629
    0
    Aug 31, 2008
    Peterborough, Ontario
    Aces,

    Any updates?? Have you decided what you going to do??

    Dave
    :bowtie:
     
  7. Dmystix

    Dmystix Veteran Member

    291
    1
    Apr 1, 2004
    Pa
    You can get them from IOC direct, not a big savings, but a couple $ less.

    http://www.weldingsuppliesfromioc.com/servlet/the-2909/MILLERMATIC-211/Detail

    Agree on the dual voltage, nice feature. I have 220 so I got the 180.

    I just ordered the 180 from them direct $788, $799 from them thru Ebay, its only $11, but no sense giivin it to Ebay.
    Ordered it Friday, its on the local UPS truck for delivery this morning.
    Don
     

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