TIG vs MIG welding opinions for beginner

Discussion in 'Garages, Workshops & Tools' started by Aceshigh, Feb 1, 2010.

TIG or MIG For a beginner ??

Poll closed Feb 22, 2010.
  1. TIG

    5 vote(s)
    12.5%
  2. MIG

    35 vote(s)
    87.5%
  1. Aceshigh

    Aceshigh Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    26,757
    1
    Apr 9, 2001
    Boondocks
    Okay, so at least I guess I understand what the gas is for now. :)
     
  2. kik_start

    kik_start BANNED

    3,296
    0
    Sep 3, 2006
    gone crazy

    gas doesn't do that...but being good at welding does.

    They will spatter with or without gas if you don't know how to weld. The diff is with gas, the flux core wire is not needed and there isn't the slag that has to be chipped off the weld from the flux.

    Where is John Wright when you need him...LOL
     
  3. Earlsfat

    Earlsfat Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    1,504
    2
    Jun 14, 2006
    Whut?
    The shielding gas creates a barrier between the cooling weld and oxygen (regular air) - kinda like slag does on a stick welder - it sheilds the weld from impurities in the air and oxygen (oxygen burns and makes the weld cool improperly). If you're using gas (not flux core), when you get done running a bead, you're supposed to keep the gun pointed at the spot you just finished because gas still flows out of the gun for a few seconds to protect the weld from oxygen.

    (If you ever run a bead on a unit that has run out of gas you'll see the difference... the bead is atrocious looking, lol.)

    You MUST have adequate ventilation... to much build up of the shielding gas will kill you and that's no BS (it is heavier than oxygen... kinda like you'd drown / suffocate in it). This is why most welding shops will either operate with the doors open or have an elaborate ventilation system.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2010
  4. earlysecond

    earlysecond Veteran Member

    5,620
    0
    Aug 9, 2002
    Altoona, PA
    Shielding gas does ALOT when you are running the MIG and the gas stops flowing you will SEE what it does! lol.

    Free advice-
    Get a quality MIG unit that you can score parts for (Miller, Lincoln, Hobart) make sure it has the regulator and gauges set up to use with gas. Buy a gas tank and get it filled (my local supplier does exchanges for $15 for a small bottle)
    Get an autodarkening helmet, this is what turned me into a welder vs. a mess maker) even a HF one will suffice.

    AS with everything else hobby related that you are trying to learn get some scrap metal of various thickness learn to adjust the until and the gas until you can weld. Learn how to change for different thicknesses. . . .Never look back.

    You can learn it. It is not that bad at all then it becomes fun as it opens a whole new world of stuff you can fix and create.

    My new mantra is be carfule once you learn the following skills
    1. Welding
    2. Body and Paint
    3. Sewing

    BECAUSE then there is not a single "project" you will fill intimidated enough to tackle. Once this happens you want to drag nearly everything home!
    Honestly. . .I know if for a fact!

    Brent

    PS not SURE that 220v is a necessity for what you are doing. I would certainly NOT run a 220V line for a welder, compressor maybe but not welder. (this is opinion vs fact) IF you need 220 you have probably worked your way up to Dump Truck and or Backhoe restoration. . .perhaps a new passion of mine!
     
  5. Earlsfat

    Earlsfat Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    1,504
    2
    Jun 14, 2006
    Whut?
    PS - If you buy a cheapo helmet (IE Harbor Freight) .. .make sure you can sure the replacement lenses covers... alot of the cheapo units have odd sized lenses that are hard to source those for.
     
  6. Aceshigh

    Aceshigh Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    26,757
    1
    Apr 9, 2001
    Boondocks
    Well you just answered my next question......

    how deadly is this gas if I inhale it ?? Are we talking it's just as bad as
    painting with the door closed ??? Only that bad or worse?

    As for the helmet, I'm looking into a self darkening one and I'm not cheaping out on that.
    I value my eyesight ALOT after my eye injury.

    LMFAO!!!! That's hilarious....thanks for the write ups too guys.
    BIG TIME helpful.

    I've got a good idea on what to get now. :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2010
  7. Earlsfat

    Earlsfat Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    1,504
    2
    Jun 14, 2006
    Whut?
    I have a HF auto-darkening 9-13 helmet... $49 IIRC... I looked all over & the response rate was WAY faster than that of the Hobart, etc helmets that cost $200+.

    But yeah... that gas is bad stuff. One of the guys in my welding class had a coworker die... he was welding rr tank cars and the ventilation tube slipped and the exhaust hole wasn't big enough to keep up... suffocated in argon / co2 mix. Apparently there's no odor or taste... get woozy and keel over. I wouldn't imagine it being healthy to inhale in ANY quantity, but I'm sure any welding supply store could answer that one better.

    All I know is that when I get mine (hobart handler 140 or 187 this spring), the garage door will be open and the exhaust fan running whenever the tank's valve is open.
     
  8. Orange71

    Orange71 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    3,793
    0
    Jan 31, 2001
    Finksburg, MD
    Be aware that just about any breeze will disrupt the welding gas from around the weld. Windows open, door open, whatever, is fine just no breeze.

    I have a MIG Hobart Handler 135...very easy to learn with and will do any job I need to do on my car. Practice on similar metal thicknesses you want to do a permanent weld on to get the heat and wire speed right.
    Do some internet research and practice, practice, practice. Know a welder? Have them come over and show you some things and practice, practice, practice.
     
  9. Aceshigh

    Aceshigh Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    26,757
    1
    Apr 9, 2001
    Boondocks
    [​IMG]

    Great.....so any breeze can disrupt the gas around the welds......but breathing it is really unsafe. LMAO
    Catch 22 there......I guess I'll go to a welding store and ask what kind of breathing apparatus is recommended.
     
  10. BusDriver

    BusDriver Veteran Member

    1,358
    0
    Apr 28, 2004
    Charlotte, NC
    You'd have to weld a LOT and your garage be darn near hermetically sealed for the tiny amount that comes out of a home use MIG to be any danger. Honestly, I wouldn't worry about that.

    Just getting a whiff of Ar/CO2 is harmless. The worst danger you'd likely run into at home is if you ever weld any galvanized steel, those fumes are NASTY.
     

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