Tesla will reveal semi-truck 'beast' next month

Discussion in 'The BS Topic' started by Bandit723, Sep 15, 2017.

  1. Todd80Z28

    Todd80Z28 Moderator Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    That would be interesting...
    The map in the Teslas already does this. It plans the trip, tells you when/where to stop, will tell you how many of the charging spots are currently occupied. Wait times aren't there, of course, but likely will be as more charging stations are built out.

    The expectation that the entire infrastructure be mature before any cars arrive is unrealistic- no industry ever has done this (were there a million gas stations and an interstate system in place in 1908 when the Model T arrived?). The better question is why aren't any of the other manufacturers making any real effort at all at fast charging? Even if Tesla goes away, the 10,000 existing Superchargers don't, and by the time they would actually go away, that number will be 20k+. Perhaps Buffett will come in and swoop them up.:)
     
  2. Todd80Z28

    Todd80Z28 Moderator Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Just a test mule, won't be the final version. It looks to be a Freightliner Cascadia day cab on a LWB chassis, with the battery pack added on... proof of concept.

    Supposed to look like this, we'll find out in November-
    [​IMG]

    From "the wild"-
    [​IMG]

    On the flatbed (with its fairing on the ground to the left)... but look closely on the left, by the XTRA trailer- the test mule from the video.
     
  3. danbrennan

    danbrennan Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Tesla limits supercharging after some number of them, to protect the battery. I've wondered about he tradeoff between charging current and battery life,

    https://chargedevs.com/newswire/why-is-tesla-limiting-the-charging-rate-at-superchargers/

    "For a while now, some Tesla owners have been complaining on the forums that their charging rate at Superchargers has been reduced. Many factors affect the charging rate, so it was hard to isolate the reason until one Tesla owner took a road trip on which he used several different Superchargers, and never experienced a rate above 90 kW (the top charging rate is 120 kW). He took the issue to the Tesla Service Center, and the technician’s response reads in part: “Once vehicle has been DC fast charged over a specified amount, the battery management system restricts DC charging to prevent degradation of the battery pack. According to Tesla engineers, this vehicle has seen significant DC fast charging and now has permanently restricted DC charging speeds. Important to note, Supercharging will always still be available to the vehicle and the battery pack has not yet experienced significant degradation due to the amount of DC fast charging performed on the pack up until this point in time.”"

    "It seems this particular owner has been using DC fast-charging almost exclusively, which is far from the usual scenario – he has used CHAdeMO 245 times, and Superchargers “50 to 60” times."
     
  4. BLUE72CAMARO

    BLUE72CAMARO Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I just want to know where all this power that will be required to charge millions of electrical vehicles is going to come from? Around me power plants are closing up or shutting down units permanently left and right. With that happening where is all the power required to charge everyones car going to come from and at what cost?
     
  5. danbrennan

    danbrennan Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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  6. Knuckle Dragger

    Knuckle Dragger Moderator Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    You're supposed to ignore that and hop on the "change is coming" bandwagon man :)
     
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  7. Todd80Z28

    Todd80Z28 Moderator Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    It'll come from new power plants. For every uneconomical coal burner that's dropping, a few gas turbines are popping up. Fracking is eating coal's lunch, and your power companies know this.
    Also let's be realistic- the battery market can't yet support millions of vehicles, which is another example of requiring a complete infrastructure before demand is there for it.
    None of this happens overnight.
     
  8. mrdragster1970

    mrdragster1970 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    .


    I read something today about the elect semi's are about to hit the streets in Calif.???
    They were tested on the docks or ?? and now they approved local runs???

    I still say we should be building more nuke plants. Not on the damn beach or fault line :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
    With today's knowledge, they should have been building them the last 20 years and closing all oil fired plants.
    We should not be wasting oil on anything except gas & diesel!!!!!!
    All oil should be synthetic, not organic, and not synthesized from crude oil components!!!!!!



    .
     
  9. SS Performance

    SS Performance Member

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    200-300 mile range for a semi? When I was an owner/operator 500-600 miles per day was the norm. An before anyone says you can stop and recharge, no a semi can't or rather the driver can't. From the time the driver gets behind the wheel he has to stop at 14 hours or 11 driving hours which ever comes first. Then he must be out of service for 10 hours of which he must be in the sleeper for 8 hours.

    Might be OK for a city truck but not over the road.

    Also how much do the batteries and motor weigh as compared to the diesel engine and fuel? That could have a serious impact on load capacity.

    And I too have seen diesels accelerate that fast.
     
  10. GoldenOne7710

    GoldenOne7710 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I just got a brand new 2018 Volvo tractor this past Monday. The one it replaced was a '13...with an improved power train. Main difference is the new one has a 75 gallon fuel tank vs the old one's 100 gallon tank...and some upgraded HID headlights, LED interior lights, etc.

    So far this new one is getting just shy of 8mpg with most of my runs are to the GA mountains. That's pretty substantial, IMO. I average 350 miles per day. Those batteries would have to come a long way in capacity to survive a day of running like I do. If I pushed it...I could likely get 570ish miles on a tank of 71 usable gallons...which is supposedly when the pickup starts sucking air.

    These same trucks over on the coast where the terrain is much flatter, I understand are getting 10mpg average.
     

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