Sea Foam: Any Thoughts?

Discussion in 'Tips 'n' Tricks Topic' started by slayer021175666, Jul 18, 2016.

  1. Coadster32

    Coadster32 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    1,467
    85
    Oct 2, 2013
    Milford,CT
    Yes. Get the motor up to temp, and spray in the carb is fine. You'll throttle it up to about 2500rpm. There are videos, (I beleive right on their website), on how to do this properly. It will smoke, but don't be alarmed.
     
  2. zfool

    zfool Veteran Member

    519
    5
    May 19, 2014
    Rochester, MN
    A friend of mine worked at an engine manufacturer, they spent allot of money to develop a fuel additive for their generators. They were never able to make anything better than Sea Foam. They repackaged it and sold it under their name for a short time.
     
  3. COPO

    COPO Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    16,520
    301
    Sep 15, 1999
    Ontario, Canada
    I pour the Sea Foam in this container, add compressed air then spray down the carb.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. mickstan

    mickstan Veteran Member

    927
    5
    Jun 11, 2012
    E'ville, IL
    oooooooo pressurized sea foam!
     
  5. COPO

    COPO Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    16,520
    301
    Sep 15, 1999
    Ontario, Canada
  6. zfool

    zfool Veteran Member

    519
    5
    May 19, 2014
    Rochester, MN
    Im always leery of adding it to the oil and putting the engine under load like they suggest, so i just idle it for the full treatment. thats an interesting system there COPO
     
  7. slayer021175666

    slayer021175666 Veteran Member

    1,212
    57
    Feb 29, 2016
    Idaho
    COPO? What The heck is THAT?!
     
  8. COPO

    COPO Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    16,520
    301
    Sep 15, 1999
    Ontario, Canada
    Oil catch can. Fumes from the PCV going in and clean air going into the carb.
     
  9. slayer021175666

    slayer021175666 Veteran Member

    1,212
    57
    Feb 29, 2016
    Idaho
    Made out of a SeaFoam can?
     
  10. Lynd McCormick

    Lynd McCormick Member

    78
    2
    Oct 6, 2017
    Finleyville, PA
    I know this is an old thread, but I thought I'd throw my experience at you.

    I purchased a 2007 Toyota Camry 4 cylinder from a reputable Toyota dealership with 94,000 miles on it. The car was marked "certified used" which means that it was thouroughly serviced and checked. The car was meticulously maintained since new by the dealership that sold it originally. Before picking it up at the dealership, whom I've had a long term working relationship with, they installed new tires, changed the oil, flushed the transmission, and flushed the radiator. There were no reported oil consumption issues reported and it would have surfaced at the dealership during their regular service.

    I, in my ultimate wisdom, thought that it would be a good idea to use Seafoam in the fuel tank and I did so only once. Within 1500 miles I saw a warning flash up on the dashboard, but it happened so quickly and went away, I couldn't read it. The next day something flashed up on the dash again and it said "low engine oil pressure"! I pulled over immediately and found that there was no oil on the dipstick! I immediately walked to an auto parts store and purchased 2 quarts of oil and filled it up. I called the dealer who had me bring it in immediately.

    The dealership did an oil consumption test and it failed miserably. Fast forward, my car now burns 1 quart of oil every 1200 miles! After negotiating with the dealer and Toyota, they rebuilt my engine. Upon tear down inspection, the oil return holes behind the piston rings were clogged solid with what looked like carbon that you would see in a 2 stroke engine. The inside of the engine was super clean as a well maintained engine should be.

    While some 4 cylinder Toyota engines were known for this issue, it is my claim that Seafoam loosened carbon in the combustion chamber that made its way down and clogged the piston's oil return holes and causes this problem. The gunk that was clogging the holes was likened to creosote that looked like it had been liquified then solidified. Once these return holes were clogged, the engine pushed the oil out, yet I had no large indication of oil burning smoke. The exhaust pipe however was coated in black oily gunk.

    I would and have since used Seafoam in my 2 stroke Mercury outboard, but I will never again use it in a vehicle.
     

Share This Page