pyrometers

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting & Diagnosis' started by zekefreak, Sep 17, 2017.

  1. zekefreak

    zekefreak Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Apr 16, 2006
    western PA
    I wasn't sure which forum to ask this question so if this isn't the appropriate forum then moderators, please move.
    Anyways, I'm thinking of purchasing a pyrometer to help in analyzing and tuning my engine and I don't know much about them. What should I look for? What should I avoid? Are the cheaper ones ($20-$50) worth buying. I am not using this in a professional manner so pinpoint accuracy isn't necessary, just for reference. What are you using?
     
  2. Joekool

    Joekool Veteran Member

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    Feb 4, 2002
    Hollister CA USA
    An air/fuel ratio sensor would be better. A pyrometer just tells you temperature and while that can be helpful it doesn't tell you much about how the engine is running. They are most useful in vehicles that tow or that use a turbo with a lot of boost. Heavy load and/or boost will increase exhaust temps and that can cause damage or destruction of a turbo.
     
  3. zekefreak

    zekefreak Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    1,532
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    Apr 16, 2006
    western PA
    Yes, I guess I should get one of those also. It would be much more accurate.
     
  4. xten

    xten Veteran Member

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    Sep 24, 2014
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    I have a RayTech. No, you don't need a good one. If your car has headers, or you can read the manifold pipes individually, (never did one with manifolds) they are very helpful. Mine has a pin-point laser. If you point it at each primary tube it will tell you a lot by reading EGT's, like which cylinder is dead, weak, or lean if that's what you're looking for.
     
  5. budro6968

    budro6968 Veteran Member

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    Jax Florida
  6. xten

    xten Veteran Member

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    Sep 24, 2014
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Yep, very good if you have a bake booth. When instructions say "Bake @ 140° for 30 minutes, it means surface temp. In my booth, it takes around 151° ambient to achieve 140° surface temp, and that's good to know.
     
  7. budro6968

    budro6968 Veteran Member

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    Apr 2, 2016
    Jax Florida
    Yeah in a busy shop you want it cured fast to be able to fix issues quickly and turn around to send it down the road.
     

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