Proper Setup for Relocating the Battery to the Trunk

Discussion in 'Electrical Systems' started by sandiego74, Nov 4, 2017.

  1. sandiego74

    sandiego74 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    953
    10
    Feb 23, 2009
    San Diego, CA
    So I hope that I have everything wired up. Tried to see if it would start up, and nothing. Took my test light and power is good until it hits the solenoid. Nothing else is getting power. Now, that's the point, right? Or is the ignition post supposed to be getting full time power and the starter line is only hot when engaged? Maybe I should return the newer-style solenoid and get the go-to older model?

    I hate electrical...
     
  2. Scott51

    Scott51 Veteran Member

    405
    21
    Jan 2, 2012
    New Zealand
    if you've followed the mad diagram you should have power at the #CN-1 terminal block (new junction), alternator BAT post, HAZ STOP fuse, TAIL fuse and CTSY LTR fuse at all times. That is unless you decided to add a kill switch somewhere and have wired it up wrong.

    When you turn the key power should travel through your Neutral safety switch then to the solenoid (blue wire on the diagram) activating the solenoid so it sends power to the starter.

    don't throw money at new parts just yet, it's extremely unlikely that's the problem.
     
  3. John Wright

    John Wright Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    13,935
    45
    Aug 9, 2002
    Rustburg, Va
    Did you add the jumper at the starter to the original solenoid?

    Your old solenoid wire from the key should have pwr when the key is in the crank position and wired to the st#1 terminal on the new solenoid like in the mad diagram you posted.
     
  4. sandiego74

    sandiego74 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    953
    10
    Feb 23, 2009
    San Diego, CA
    Figured out I had put the 8 ga wire on the wrong solenoid post. Haven't tried starting it yet, but it cranks! Going to clean everything up before I attempt to start it.

    I'm going to go ahead and post pictures of everything and do a write-up in order to help future folks that may have the same issues as I did.
     
    John Wright likes this.
  5. sandiego74

    sandiego74 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    953
    10
    Feb 23, 2009
    San Diego, CA
    I apologize ahead of time for the poor lighting and everything being messy. Still need to tidy it all up.

    Here's what my trunk looks like right now. I used this battery hold-down tray (https://www.summitracing.com/parts/bsp-248910), which I like for the cost and convenience, though I wish it came all black. I used Marine-style battery terminals, thanks to the recommendation of others from this thread, and I also highly recommend them for their convenience. I used this relocation kit from Summit (https://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-g1208-1) and this disconnect switch (https://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-830050). Both worked well enough for me.

    IMG_2772.JPG

    Now, had I dropped the fuel tank, I placed the disconnect switch further to the back by the solenoid, which would've cleaned up the trunk a lot and saved me some cable length. However, I didn't want to go through the hassle of removing and replacing the tank by myself, so I did it this way.

    In the picture below, the white circle is highlighting where I ground the battery-negative cable in the trunk.

    IMG_2770.JPG

    Below is where I mounted the solenoid, as there are already some predrilled holes to use. This is the style solenoid I used (https://www.summitracing.com/parts/mof-sw1951c/overview/make/ford) because I like how compact it is with the cables on, though this style is more commonly used (https://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-830050).

    IMG_2769.JPG

    I ran the wires through this hole, as the edges are rounded and won't cut through the cable when I tie them down.

    IMG_2764.JPG

    This is where I sent the wires through the firewall. I figured they are high enough to where passengers won't be kicking them, and I'll tie them down to the side when I'm done. I used copious amounts of silicone to hold the rubber grommets in, for they kept annoying me by popping out when I routed the wires through them.

    IMG_2762.JPG IMG_2761.JPG

    This is where the wires protrude the firewall. Again, I apologize for the messy state that they are in. Because of my headers and the tight clearances they provide, I had to extend the positive battery cable up towards the front before attaching it to the starter. The two relay wires are small enough to fit into this protective metal tube that was on the car when I got it (not sure if it's factory or not).

    IMG_2756.JPG

    These are the locations that I grounded the engine with 1/0 cable. One from the starter mounting bolt and the other from the bellhousing bolt to the lower firewall/floorpan.

    IMG_2747.JPG IMG_2758.JPG
     
  6. sandiego74

    sandiego74 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    953
    10
    Feb 23, 2009
    San Diego, CA
    Here's the MadElectrical goods. The first, their Trunk Mount Battery Helper Kit (http://madelectrical.com/catalog/tm-1.shtml) and their Relay Kit (http://madelectrical.com/catalog/rly-1.shtml).

    I was told by Mark, one of the specialists at MadElectrical, that the relay is needed if you have any sort of aftermarket, non-factory-style mini-starter, which I do.

    A big disclaimer: their website is NOT updated, nor are the prices. They do not sell the solenoid kit any more, and the TM-1 and Relay kit cost me about $140. However, their kits are amazing, come with everything you need and more, including very detailed instructions with excellent diagrams.

    I mounted both kits to the firewall, which worked out great for space to work on everything. The kits have everything you need to know on how to wire everything up, so I won't go into that too much, unless someone specifically wants me to.

    IMG_2760.JPG
     
    muscl car likes this.
  7. dave@ztech

    dave@ztech Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    369
    21
    Mar 27, 2016
    NY
    Hi ,
    I have one question, why did you not put the battery over the rear axle , like I thought most people do for the weight balance, transfer thing, and if you are going for a racing application , I thought the kill switch, had to be accessible from the exterior of the car, my bad, 2 questions, HAA HA , I am just curious , as I am also looking to do this, and I am easily confused, as to what is really needed and what you are supposed to do, so I have been watching , with great interest.
    Thanks
     
  8. sandiego74

    sandiego74 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    953
    10
    Feb 23, 2009
    San Diego, CA
    You're EXACTLY the kind of person I was hoping to help with this, as I had a lot of questions, too.

    I guess it is hard to tell from the first picture, but the battery is as far back and as far to the passenger side of the trunk as I could get it to go while still having easy access to it and the cables around it. I'm not expert, but I think putting it past the axle, rather than over it, would be more ideal for weight transfer. Our cars are so nose heavy, so getting a good amount of weight as far back as possible helps.

    As for the disconnect switch, you really only need it exposed for NHRA drag racing and some other high-end racing sanctions, but not for what I want to do with it. Plus, with it being hidden in the locked trunk, it adds security for me.
     
  9. dave@ztech

    dave@ztech Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    369
    21
    Mar 27, 2016
    NY
    Hi,
    Well the reason , I thought, that they put the battery over the rear axle, was the weight 50/50 thing that people are trying to achieve , I was reading some where that , moving 50 pounds, or whatever the weight of the battery, from the front , to right over the rear wheels , was a desirable thing to do, and yes you are probably correct about the switch, however, if you are not able to open the trunk, then who is going to hit the switch, if you needed someone to hit the switch? Also , I read some where , that, get ready for this, if you have too many grounds, it can also cause a problem ?!! Anyways , what questions do you still have , looks like you are pretty much finished, except cleaning up the wiring, and, there is quite a bit about running the main hot wire inside the car, some think that it is NOT , a good idea, anyways, I have all the parts to do mine, I just want to be sure it is correct, so maybe we can fiqure it out !!
     
  10. sandiego74

    sandiego74 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    953
    10
    Feb 23, 2009
    San Diego, CA
    Precisely. Moving the battery does help quite a bit with the weight distinction.

    As for the switch, that would be problem for me, but I don't think I'll be doing anything that may involve me needing someone to switch it off. I can always move it around in the future if I need to.

    Running the wires inside the car vs outside is highly debated, though I think a lot of it is just personal preference. Either way, you have to be able to protect the wires as best you can. I figured it was just easier to route them through the interior rather than having to tie them into the frame. Also, I believe the whole purpose of the separate solenoid in the trunk is to prevent having a hot, large cable running through the car.
     

Share This Page