New shop options?

Discussion in 'Garages, Workshops & Tools' started by CB-Man, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. The Champ

    The Champ Veteran Member

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    Sep 14, 2000
    MN
    I went with a total of 5 windows and I'm happy to have the natural light during the day.

    I went with 4 tall skinny one's on the sides and one short and wide one mounted up high on the back wall.

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  2. BamaRocker

    BamaRocker Veteran Member

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    Nov 29, 2005
    Meridianville, Alabama
    I just built a 32X50....

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  3. 1971CamaroGuy

    1971CamaroGuy Veteran Member

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    Oct 31, 2004
    Arkansas
    you guys with the big shops are making me feel bad lol

    Home I bought in may came with a 20' x 24' shop building sharing the same driveway as my double car garage. It was unfinished so I spruced it up a bit

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  4. CB-Man

    CB-Man Veteran Member

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    May 25, 2011
    Newport, MI
    My camaro is currently sitting in my attached 20x22 garage. Also packed full of other stuff.
    The new shop idea might not happen for a year or two now. The payment would make money tight. So no car funds.
    I'm going to try my best to make the existing 30x32 pole barn work.
    Do what I can to vent it then put foam board on the ceiling.
    I want to heat it with a pellet stove.
    I will have to build a lean to so I can store my boat then fix up my old wooden barn for the tractor. I'd like to keep my shop strictly a shop.
     
  5. CB-Man

    CB-Man Veteran Member

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    May 25, 2011
    Newport, MI
    I think if I do go with a new shop I may just go with a pole barn as I can get more for the money and foundation is cheaper.
    Some say the floor will make the shop cold and not fun to work in.
    I'd do whatever it takes to not work laying down.

    Those who just have a pole barn or slab foundation do the radiant tube heaters heat up the concrete pretty good?
    I wouldn't think it would be bad if you kept it heated all winter
     
  6. CB-Man

    CB-Man Veteran Member

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    May 25, 2011
    Newport, MI
    Eave venting!!!!

    Ok I know I'm posting alot but just trying to get a good path forward.
    So my barn has no overhang or eave soffit vent.
    I'm just trying to figure out how to get some eave venting.
    So here are some pictures of inside the barn of 2x4's between each rafter that appear to be there only to close the gap and keep birds out.
    I was thinking I could remove these 2x4's and put screens in. These 2x4's are above the ceiling line so I would get air in from the eaves up to the ridge vent.

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  7. CB-Man

    CB-Man Veteran Member

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    May 25, 2011
    Newport, MI
    Well....

    Well if anyone is still reading this I join garage journal forum and began asking questions.
    They pretty much talked me out of finishing the pole barn and trying to heat the cold slab in the winter.

    I guess I'm back to square one. Move everything I can out of my 20x22 attached garage and into the pole barn. Finish my small garage and throw up a small heater. Hopefully I can just the car to bare shell and store parts in the pole barn and just have the shell on a rotisserie in the small garage
     
  8. OsborneConst

    OsborneConst Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Oct 25, 2009
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Before I became a builder, I worked at/managed an HVAC company for about 8 years. We installed heating in a lot of barns, with a concrete foundation, post frame, and slab. There is no difference in heating them, as you still have a concrete slab sitting on the ground. One of the nicest ways, although probably the most expensive is to run tubing in the floor with a boiler or outdoor wood boiler. That keeps the concrete warm, and everything on the ground is nice and warm. The next way is the radiant tube heaters like you mentioned. They are nice, because they are fairly inexpensive, and they work well by heating the concrete and other objects as well. One drawback with the tube heaters is that if you are working under a car that has been sitting in the same place, it will heat the topside of the car, and not so much the concrete below, unless you leave it at a warmer temperature. Both of these systems really need to be left on most of the time at a fairly consistent temperature to be most effective. They are both fairly efficient, but they are slow to heat up, especially the boiler system in the concrete. The other drawback with both of these systems is no option for cooling, which doesn't matter for a lot of people. The system I am installing in my barn is a forced air system, like in most houses, which will allow me to keep it at 55 degrees all the time in the winter, and kick it up to seventy fairly quickly if I am working on stuff. I will also have A/C for in the summer. The disadvantage to the forced air system is that since it moves air, it will tend to move dust around.
     
  9. LADDTWZ

    LADDTWZ Veteran Member

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    Aug 11, 2012
    Schoolcraft, Michigan
    Agreed with the forced air. moves dust. I had an old forced air furnace in my shop that used propane. Not cheap!. Finally tore it out and put in a wood stove. Still get some dust, but managable. ( i get more dust from the blast cabinet than the stove)Couple weekend in the winter a year and i can cut all the wood i need for the following season. The farmers down here are taking out alot of fence rows of trees. easy cutting and good wood. Another couple weekends of splitting and stacking and I can heat the shop all year for a few $$ and some labor. much cheaper and believe it or not warmer than propane. I fill it 3 times a day and it runs all day. It can be 5d outside and i can keep it in the 70d range. takes about a half hour at open damper and no kidding it so hot in here you have to open the door. Once the concrete heats up it hold the heat for a day or two if i'm not around. Went away for 4 days last winter, came home and the barn was still sitting at 44d. FWIW.

    on another thought, find some people who are remodeling. they usually have old counters, cabinets, sinks, etc that they will give you to avoid having to haul them away. Thats how i got the majority of whats inside mine.
     

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