New shop options?

Discussion in 'Garages, Workshops & Tools' started by CB-Man, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. CB-Man

    CB-Man Veteran Member

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    May 25, 2011
    Newport, MI
    Ok. I have an old 30x30 pole barn where my boat tractor lawn mowers atv.. Etc live. I plan on putting a concrete floor in and clearing out my attached garage for only cars stuff. Making a shop. But it is small and I would an going to see if I can get financed to build an actual shop.

    So my question is for those of you who went through the process of having a garage/shop built. What are the pros/cons and opinions on likes and dislikes of the different build style options.
    Concrete slab with a steel truss building, pole barn finished with concrete poured floor or a conventional garage stick built with 2ft block or poured concrete footers ?
     
  2. mickstan

    mickstan Veteran Member

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    Jun 11, 2012
    E'ville, IL
    Well, if you are planning to use it in the winter time, you'll need to pour a frost wall (3-4 ft deep) no matter what the building type. A slab floor will suck up the cold in a BIG way without a frost wall. My free standing garage(26x28) was actually a kit from the local lumberyard. I got some friends together and a backhoe to dig the footing and frost wall. Rented the forms and got another friend who does concrete to do all the concrete work. We poured the floor on a 50 degree, damp overcast fall morning at sun-up. Perfect weather for concrete work! Borrowed a couple of plate tampers to compact the ag-lime before pouring the floor. Put rebar tied together every 18 inches and anchored into the walls for the floor. The floor is 5 inches thick. Brought the friends together for a couple of days and erected the building. Had the lumberyard deliver the trusses and we set them in place. Lumberyard used the boom truck for the roof sheeting and again for the shingles. Put up the siding and such myself with one other guy. It took less than a month for the entire process. Insulated, drywalled, insulated 16ft door, 100 amp service and lots of outlets!
    I've got TONS of pictures of the entire process. Best investment in my property bar-none. Plenty of room, 2 1/2 cars wide, and a nice 8 foot deep area across the back for the workbenchs and stuff.

    My buddy built a huge pole barn a year earlier. Poured the floor after it was up. He insulated it and put a gas furnace in, but the floor makes it soooo cold he really cant use it in the winter and it sweats like crazy in the spring.
     
  3. CB-Man

    CB-Man Veteran Member

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    May 25, 2011
    Newport, MI
    Thanks!

    Thanks for the reply! That is a good point about the frost wall. I think I do remember my friend talking about that. I have a friend who does concrete as well. Everyone always says build it yourself. I moved to where I am 4 years ago. I don't have many friends. I don't think I could get people together to help build it. I will definitely go that way though with the frost wall.
    I am pretty handy around the house with remodeling projects but I have never built anything or did any siding of roofs.
    Hanging siding seams easy enough it's the flashing and over hangs and soffits that seam hard.
     
  4. mickstan

    mickstan Veteran Member

    927
    5
    Jun 11, 2012
    E'ville, IL
    In a cold weather area, you really need the frost wall. Use your friend who does concrete work to the fullest extent! I had never "built" anything like my garage before either. First time adventure for me too. But it was a great way to learn how houses are built. Get yourself a GOOD circular saw, and I HIGHLY recommend a Paslode gas operated framing nail gun, its worth its weight in gold, and a GOOD cordless drill.
    Soffit is really easy. Make a jig to cut multiple pieces of soffit one right after another. Use the circular saw with a fine tooth blade and reverse the blade to cut the aluminum. It can also do double duty as a siding jig to cut it to length also. I even used my jig again with some modifacations to cut pavers. I'll pull it out of the shed and get some pictures if you want. Its just made of scrap lumber.
    Two or three guys can build the entire garage, but the more help you have the faster it can go, but you'll assume the role of foreman for a time!
    Another friend paid to have his garage built last summer. It turned out nice, but he paid about twice as much as I did for 2/3rds the size and no frost wall.
    Roofing? I HATE it. Get some Mexicans to do it. Everything else can be done by you and someone who knows how to frame.
    Just remember, get the footings and frost walls as perfectly square as possible. Mine was off by 1/4 inch out of square and that darn 1/4 inch followed me all the way thru the job. To the point that the drywall on my ceiling had to be trimmed at an angle by 1/4 inch on almost every sheet. If the foundation is out of square, it will follow all the way to the end.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
  5. mickstan

    mickstan Veteran Member

    927
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    Jun 11, 2012
    E'ville, IL
  6. mickstan

    mickstan Veteran Member

    927
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    Jun 11, 2012
    E'ville, IL
    As far as getting friends together to help, buy them food and booze. First the work, then the food, then more work, then at the end of the day, the booze. Trust me, they'll be back.
     
  7. ffshu

    ffshu Veteran Member

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    Mar 22, 2011
    New Kent Virginia
    When I built my garage 6 years ago, I had priced all the options. Metal was too high then and still is today, IMO. I built a 30x36 stick built with 2' of foundation above the floor and I used 10' studs to give me a 12' ceiling height for my twin post lift. I had some friends of mine come over who knew how to build things, and we had it under roof in no time. I had a lot of connections along the way. A guy I hunt with owns a Lull forklift, so he set my trusses, picked up the hack of plywood, and set the shingle after we put the tarpaper down. My electrician friend showed my how to wire an outlet and light switch, told me how I needed to pull the wire for different circuits, and I did it all by myself. He came and hooked the feed to the panel. I have just under $20k in mine and that includes getting the area cleared of trees and putting in a 120' driveway.

    You can do it. Take your time. Some things you will have to pay for. I put all the siding up on mine except for the very top in the gable ends and I got a siding guy to do that and wrap my garage. Cash money on the side for him on the weekend.
     
  8. CB-Man

    CB-Man Veteran Member

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    May 25, 2011
    Newport, MI
    Thanks!

    Thanks for the info. While I don't have many friends or connections where I live I might think about stick building my own and finishing in metal barn siding and roof.
    While searching I came across Versatube garages. Seems like a pretty easy kit to assembly and not bad prices.
    Also I found a member on here put one up and it looked easy and looked great.
    http://www.versatube.com/
     
  9. zeebad1

    zeebad1 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Nov 24, 2001
    Northern IL USA
  10. spons

    spons Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Mar 21, 2010
    Indy

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