Lynn's 71 Project

Discussion in 'Project Progress' started by lhorne81, Oct 30, 2017.

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  1. lhorne81

    lhorne81 Member

    51
    5
    May 26, 2011
    Spring, Texas
    I was able to go by Enviro Clean on Saturday. I spoke with the owner who says that they still blast cars, but doing bodywork is their main focus. From the way that he spoke (Billy Anderson), he purchased the business from the previous owners of Enviro Clean. He said it is typically a one week turn around, and they blast the cars on the other side of the shop. He quoted me a price of $500 to blast just the carriage and $650 if I wanted it blasted and shot with epoxy primer. Note - This is just a price for the carriage; I am stripping the front fenders, doors, lower valence and header panel myself. He offered to blast and primer the subframe too for additional money if I desired. He showed me an old International pickup that he is doing for a customer right now. It looked great, but then again it was in a dark workshop and was already painted. He raised concerns about panels warping, especially the roof.

    I am on the fence right now about getting it blasted. If money wasn't an option, I would have already dropped it off. But since I am on a tight budget, I am forced to explore all alternatives. I am also running into the problem of getting it over there. While it is less than 10 miles from my house, I don't have free access to a car hauler. I have rented car haulers in the past from the local U-Haul, but that is going to run at least $60 for each trip.

    For the time being, I am going to research a few more folks that offer blasting services and keep plugging away at what I can do at home.

    Thanks again for the contact.
     
  2. lhorne81

    lhorne81 Member

    51
    5
    May 26, 2011
    Spring, Texas
    I didn't get a chance to spend as much time in the garage this weekend as I originally hoped, but I was able to run across the front fenders with a sander. At this point, they are almost ready to be primed.

    Fenders Prepped.JPG

    I have one area of concern on the driver side fender as shown in the picture.

    Driver Side Fender Damage.JPG

    I also noticed a bubble over the passenger side window (roof). So I decided "What the heck, let's see what lies beneath". I took a paint/rust stripper on an angle die grinder and...

    Passenger side - Paint Layers.JPG

    Looks like the car was white from the factory (as said on the Cowl Tag), and was painted blue at some time, then horribly repainted white by a group of 3rd graders. Sorry no offense to 3rd graders. Now that I think about it, maybe I should bite the bullet and spend the money to have it blasted.
     
  3. Da-bigguy

    Da-bigguy Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    3,317
    71
    Jan 19, 2010
    Cypress, TX
    You are welcome! Thanks for the info, I will definitely keep that in mind. It seems kind of odd to me that he bought what was primarily an industrial cleaning business that did auto body blasting on the side and is now using it as a body shop. Keep me posted if you find anyone else to do the blasting.
     
  4. houstonvett

    houstonvett New Member

    9
    1
    Jun 1, 2009
    Houston
    There is a person out in Baytown who does sand blasting and media blasting on site. He does good work for a very good price. You might want to check him out. I take pieces such as hoods and fenders out to him 1st and have him shoot them with baking soda so you get all of the paint removed. If you are on a budget build, you can strip off the paint that is on the car with a 7 1/4" grinder and some 80 grit sanding discs. The sheet metal back in 1971 was far thicker then today's pieces are and just keep moving the sanding disc around all of the time, not pressing too hard on the surface while doing so. You will not damage the piece and the rough surface will make the primer stick better to boot. 7 1/4" grinders and 80 grit sand paper was the tool of choice when making auto body repairs up until the 90s sometime. That is when the auto body sheet metal panels became made out of high strength alloys and became thinner in the process.

    On your dash problem if you are 1/2 way decent with a MIG welder, attach a small metal piece, 18 gauge or so under the piece that needs to be repaired, covering the repair area completely. Make sure the entire repair surface is prepped well, ready to be welded. All metal in the soon to be repaired area, is prepped down to clean shiny metal, then you are ready to proceed. The devil is in the details and preforming the correct prep work it takes, to manufacture a repair that you will never see.

    Then you can start to fill in the holes in the dash with the MIG welder, layering it small additional buildups, just like what a 3D printer does. Do little areas at a time slowly, building up the repair to be a little higher then the original dash piece was. Then take a grinder and lightly touch the repaired surface until you get it close to stock height once again. Then take a fine flat file to finish off the repair, getting it back down to original height once again. Use a good primer on the whole dash, paint it and you are good to go.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2017
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  5. houstonvett

    houstonvett New Member

    9
    1
    Jun 1, 2009
    Houston

    For your roof repair you have a few options. If you actually want to cut out the rust spot and a slightly larger adjoining area you can use a hole saw and arbor for this job. Select the right size hole saw to cut the area you want. Then take the same size hole saw and cut out a piece from your repair panel patch piece, usually the same gauge. Get a straight long magnet that will span you newly formed hole and place you repair patch piece inside the hole and let the magnet hold it in place for you. If the magnet is straight the roof panel and your patch piece will now be on the same plane height wise. Take your MIG welder and place a few spot tacks to hold the repair piece in place and now remove the magnet. Work your way around the patch piece by tacking the piece in place. Do not try to weld this piece in all at 1 time as you will warp the sheet metal from 2 much heat. Little bursts from the MIG not too close together is what you are trying for. After a few tacks walk away for a few hours and come back and place a few more tacks on the repair patch. It might take you a few days to complete the patch, but you will have something to work with that isn't warped from the heat from your repair. This magnet method works great and makes sure your panel you are working on and your repair patch are on the same plane height wise. I have used a jig saw with a metal blade and cut out a odd shaped polygon type of piece to remove the rust infected area. Use the piece you have cut out of the panel you are repairing as a template for your metal repair patch. Cut out the repair patch with the same jig saw and fit it in the hole using the magnet once again to make sure the panels line up even, then tack in place and then finish welding it in place using the tack method.

    With such a small hole in the roof, you can grind down to metal and make sure the rust is almost gone from the effected area. Use a wire brush also, to remove as much rust as possible. Fill the hole with Bondo or fiberglass material called Dynaglass, which is mixed like Bondo. Once the hole is filled, dried paint over it on the inside part in the car with Rusteolum, sealing the patch from O2. With no source of O2 rust simply can't grow anymore. Por 15 is way overkill and is a waste of money for the most part. Paint with Superglue added to it for a bonding agent might be great for nuclear subs, but is way overkill for anything else, IMO.

    For your fender get a cheap hammer and dolly set from Harbor Freight. Look at a few videos on the UTube to see how to use the dolly and hammer correctly. Use your side marker light as your guide and get the metal close to being on the same plane, height, within 1/8" or less around the area that needs to be repaired. Then put a skim coat of Bondo on the fender smoothing out your repair area and contouring the shape as needed. Bondo works great in layers 1/8" thick and less and will adhere to glass if applied to it. I have seen some folks who had trouble tying their shoes, but could produce very good body work using Bondo. It is really not too difficult to master.

    Most importantly dare to fail! You can't make an omelet without breaking a few eggs. Have the courage to tackle these small jobs and you will save yourself a lot of money and gain an education in the process. I have seen many folks who are newbies to body work or working on their cars in general. Most have defeated themselves before they have picked up a single tool in their hand, saying it is too hard or too complicated of a job. With this type of attitude you are fodder for the "professionals" in the auto field who rely on folks not wanting to at least try making the own repair first. Remember nothing ventured, nothing gained. Seems like there are a lot of knowledgeable folks in this Forum, which is a great source of knowledge if you avail yourself of it. So don't be afraid to ask questions, even the 1s you think, that might be stupid. Better to ask and know the correct procedure then go off to a dark space in the car repair Universe and FUBAR your car up a lot more then when you started your project. If you do make a mistake, don't worry about it as everyone who has ever worked on a car in the past has made many of them in their toils. You will just be catching up to them, hopefully at a very slow rate.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2017
  6. lhorne81

    lhorne81 Member

    51
    5
    May 26, 2011
    Spring, Texas
    houstonvett - Thank you for all the guidance. I really appreciate the support and recommendations. This points me in the right direction and confirms some of my decisions. I apologize for not responding to your messages sooner as it was a challenging weekend in our house. That being said, I was able to spend a little time in the garage over the weekend as shown by the following post.

    Thanks again.
     
  7. lhorne81

    lhorne81 Member

    51
    5
    May 26, 2011
    Spring, Texas
    Late last week I watched an episode of Detroit Muscle where they took the paint off a quarter panel of a 69 Charger by using a 7" polisher/sander and sandpaper. I was a little hesitant in pursuing this for paint removal on my car, but then I remembered that my nieces husband (I guess that makes him my nephew-in-law?) has a Dewalt 7" polisher/sander. That model Dewalt has an speed adjustment on it, which gave me the idea to turn the speed setting all the way down to reduce the risk of warping any panels. I went to Northern Tool last Thursday night and picked up a few 24grit discs, and was able to try it out on the car.

    I started by out applying a coat of aircraft stripper to the front lower valence. After scraping as much of the old paint off as I could, I said "Just do it" and decided to try out the polisher/sander. I kept moving it, being mindful not to stay in any one area for more than a couple seconds. It turned out pretty good. I was able to get all the paint off it, however I have some surface rust on the backside of it. I have a small orbital sander that uses hook and loop discs, that I was able to get most of the surface rust off with. But there are a few areas that still need attention. I am thinking about buying a cheap Harbor Freight sandblaster for the tough to reach areas.

    See images of how dented the lower valence is:
    Front Lower Valence.JPG

    After I took the paint off:
    IMG_0862.JPG

    Next on the list is the header panel. I might take the same approach: aircraft stripper first, then take the polisher/sander to it, then finish with the orbital sander.

    Since I had what I felt like a successful run with the sander, I decided to take a stab at the carriage.
    Passenger Side Quarter.JPG

    This took quite a bit of time and made a mess in the garage, but at least this gives me a small sense of accomplishment. I made it as far as I could before the wife rang the dinner bell and told me to stop. My goal is to do the same thing to the driver side by Sunday evening.

    The passenger side quarter looks to be shot, so I am going to order a patch panel for $50:
    Passenger Side Lower Quarter.JPG

    One last picture is the pinhole right above the passenger side door:
    Passenger Side Roof.JPG

    houstonvett gave some great recommendations. I find it funny that I started using 7" polisher/sander this weekend and then came into work this morning and read his posts. That means I am moving in the right direction! I do appreciate the idea of mainly cutting around the hole and using it as a guide or template. I have a sheet of 18ga and 22ga specifically for patches like this. I also bought a spool of .25 wire and tips.

    I look forward to everyone's feedback.
     

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  8. lhorne81

    lhorne81 Member

    51
    5
    May 26, 2011
    Spring, Texas
    What you are describing was outlined exactly in an episode of Muscle Car (on Spike). The project car they were working on was a 70 Camaro (aka "Project Limelight"). I was planning on taking this approach. Thank you for your confirmation, this gives me hope.
     
  9. Pro71bird

    Pro71bird New Member

    8
    5
    Dec 17, 2017
     
  10. lhorne81

    lhorne81 Member

    51
    5
    May 26, 2011
    Spring, Texas
    Pro71bird - I believe that it is 2 3/4" from Dynacorn. I would have to measure it or look for a part number. My wife bought it for me years ago from a local parts dealer. I can check and shoot you a reply.
     

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