How many 2nd gen camaros have survived?

Discussion in 'Camaro Questions' started by Varanus762x39, Sep 24, 2010.

  1. AEGIS43

    AEGIS43 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    May 16, 2008
    Mesa, AZ
    I can't believe I've finally seen someone who put an early 2nd gen back glass (and C-pillars) on a late 2nd gen body. Far out! I used to fantasize about that, thinking I'd never find a '70 - '73 car I could afford. Way cool.

    Not to bag on '75 - '81 cars, though. They've grown on me a lot over the past couple years. All 2nd gens are sweet to me.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2010
  2. 80WA7113

    80WA7113 Veteran Member

    1,363
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    May 22, 2002
    Indianapolis, IN

    Ahhhh...a 4 speed car! Looks like you put a heck of a lot of work into the body. I like the custom look as much as I like all stock---very cool! Did you keep the dash 79 or did you go retro on it too?
     
  3. Rich Schmidt

    Rich Schmidt Veteran Member

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    Mar 27, 2010
    Denville NJ
    I went with the interior including the dash out of my 74 Camaro parts car.

    As for the rear glass job,I actually fabbed everything. The car originally had some small spots of rust right on the outside of the window channel to 1/4 panel edge. I decided to cut the existing 79 1/4 about 1/2" outside of where it turned into the wndow opening,as well as drill out the welds that held the window bed to the inner structure. I then pie cut it in a few places and bent it up to follow the curve of the old style glass. I then added a filler to the inner structure and a filler to the outer panel and blended it all with plastic. Belive it or not,the window molding is held in place by the original window trim studs and clips from the 79. All told it took me 1 full vacation day off work and about $25 in materials since I already owned the rear glass,molding and interior trim. The entre job is also GM born with steel. The car had a trunk lid on it that had a lot of rust on the inner structure,and a hood that I cut for a snorkle scoop. I used both of them as donors for the metal work. I didnt need an early car for any of the metal work.
     
  4. AEGIS43

    AEGIS43 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    May 16, 2008
    Mesa, AZ
    Incredible! Never would have guessed that. Great job and very cool car. Are you going to leave the post- '73 tail panel for the "freak factor?" If I saw it on the road I would definitely be saying to myself, "What THE ... !"
     
  5. CMitchell

    CMitchell Veteran Member

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    Jun 1, 2008
    Southeastern N.C.
    I was thinking about this last week. I was looking at all the pictures that my cousin and I had from all of our dirt track cars. He has trashed 11 camaro's over the years before he moved up to a tube built car. I would be scared to guess how many camaro's have died to become a dirt car.
     
  6. Rich Schmidt

    Rich Schmidt Veteran Member

    4,088
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    Mar 27, 2010
    Denville NJ
    This one is destined to die,or at least be stripped and sold as a shell. I am restoring my 73,and it needs a lot of metal work,such as full toe board to tail light floors,rear rails,full 1/4's roof skin ect. I want to save the car,but need years to do it. I threw the engine,trans,rear,suspention,dash,glass nose,doors and a ton of other stuff into this 79 and have been cruising it. The 79 is a non A/C car which turns me off too. I am throwing around a lot of ideas about what to do with my cars right now, and winter is coming which makes it a lot nicer to drive the 79 since the heat really cranks. It will be around a while and will eventually be offered as a rolling project when I finally take all the stuff back off it. Its not a bad car, the outside is super solid,the floors had some holes,but are now all patched solid but mostly with home made patches. Not a good candidate for a serious resto,but a great project for a driver. I have a brand new tail panel,rear lights,bumper,brackets and all that stuff. I could easily just graft it all together,but I would rather have a real 73.

    Its sportin the interior and dash out of my 74 parts car

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2010
  7. AEGIS43

    AEGIS43 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    May 16, 2008
    Mesa, AZ
    Any way you can keep both, Rich? You have put so much time into this "early 2nd gen '79" and so radically changed what it is. It's definitely like a Frankenstein. It all seems so cool to me. Plus, you can bomb drive the thing during New Jersey winters. After all you've done to it, it seems like rigging up AC would be one of the easier adds you could do.
     
  8. Rich Schmidt

    Rich Schmidt Veteran Member

    4,088
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    Mar 27, 2010
    Denville NJ
    If I could afford to have 3 cars I might. The fact is that EVERYTHING in the way of front end sheet metal and doors ect has to go to the other car. Thats all real GM rust free,dent free steel and trim from the firewall foward. On fenderbender now and I am screwed. There is an entire pump gas 12 second drivetrain with less the 1000 miles from radiator to diff cover in there too. I still am throwing a few ideas around though.

    Right now,my race car is a 56,000 original mile rust free 73 Firebird that runs low 10's and weighs 3500# with a bone stock chassis. I really need a lighter race car,and preferably one with bigger tires. I own a complete backhalf kit and roll cage brand new in boxes,but cant bring myself to hack up the virgin floor and frame. I should really just put all the daily driver stuff into the Firebird,and maybe even hang the sheet metal on it and make it a Camaro,then take the 73 Camaro which needs everything underneath anyway,and make it a backhalf race car with a glass nose and doors ect,and put my race car drivetrain in that. I was actually thinking that I could build 2 identical cars,one street car,and one race car,both with the same wheels and all. The up side to this,is that the Firebird has an A/C firewall, doesnt need any metal work underneath, and I could sell the Firebird specific sheet metal from the doors foward and walk away with enough money to buy all new Camaro sheet metal for the back end of the car. After I swap over all the rear 1/4's,tail panel,wheel houses ect. I can just add the doors and nose from the frankenstien car. As for the 73 Camaro race car,if I make it a race car I wouldnt be as fussy about the body anyway. I would fix the rust around the window beds with weld in patches and cover it with filler and just throw lower skins on it. That would save me a ton of money right there. No drop offs,no wheel houses,or trunk floor,just lower 1/4's,tubs and a fabbed up floor.

    Who knows. At this point I have a lot of good ideas,but the thought of going from 2 running cars and 1 pile of parts to 3 piles of parts isnt very inviting.
     
  9. 73 Z

    73 Z Veteran Member Gold Member

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    Jun 9, 2007
    Los Angeles, Ca
    I can account for 1 73 Z.
     
  10. AEGIS43

    AEGIS43 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    119
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    May 16, 2008
    Mesa, AZ
    Oh, a NICE '73 Firebird ... Well, that puts a whole new paintjob on things. Dang Rich, you are in a bit of a quandry. What to do with two bitchin' 2nd gens and one frankenstein ....

    I too have fantasized about having visually identical rods - one race car and one street car (I'm a road race fan, i.e. Trans Am, but not so much tall wheels and rubberband tires). There's a line there where your street car isn't so much fun on the street anymore and your race car is REALLY not ok on the street. You know, you have the need for speed, but home and work aren't connected by a drag strip.

    I definitely agree with prioritizing the cars that are more corrosion and damage free. If anything, make frankenstein the race car. If you can bring yourself to pony-ing up to keeping three F-bodies, that is.

    '70 - '73 Firebirds, Trans Ams, Formulas are WAY special. When I'm looking at one of them I'm not thinking "too bad it's not a Camaro ..." And vice-versa.
     

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