How hot is too hot ?

Discussion in 'Florida Region' started by PalmbchZ28, Jul 17, 2017.

  1. PalmbchZ28

    PalmbchZ28 Veteran Member Gold Member

    472
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    Jan 29, 2017
    West Palm Beach Fl
    I put the car outside for 3-4 hours last week to clean the shop. I thought it was really hot so I took the temperature of the 37 year old faded dash that was in perfect condition...Other than being faded. It was 170 degrees !!!!
    I brought the Car back in he shop which stays about 75 degrees. The dash cracked while I was standing there watching it !
     
  2. PalmbchZ28

    PalmbchZ28 Veteran Member Gold Member

    472
    117
    Jan 29, 2017
    West Palm Beach Fl
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  3. harbone66

    harbone66 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Feb 15, 2011
    Central Illinois
    Did it crack once you pulled it back inside? The shock of the temp change might have caused it. Kind of like getting glass real hot then running under cold water
     
  4. PalmbchZ28

    PalmbchZ28 Veteran Member Gold Member

    472
    117
    Jan 29, 2017
    West Palm Beach Fl
    Yes it cracked within minutes. I am sure it was from the heat.
    Our tin knockers work with sheet metal ductwork on the roof in S Florida and we have seen sheet metal temps at 180 degrees. Not only too hot to touch but the sun's reflection off the metal blinds you. Pretty much have to stop around noon if you cant set a portable tent over it.
     
  5. 170°F is about 77°C, right?
    Sadly I can only talk about more modern cars (around mid 80's), but there the OEM specs call for stable material and connection up to 90°C (hotter for short periods). This concerns everything from headliner glue to plastics and gaskets.
    So I do not know if 70s GM cars already been tailored to these specs. Than again, its a 40 year old plastic and probably everything that was keeping it stable has long evaporated. So yeah, very likely that it was just that tad too much this time.

    Its a new crack, maybe you are able to fix it right away before it starts to curl or crack further.

    Just an FYI, remember to set the correct E (epsilon) value for the material you're checking the temperature of. A rather vital part on infrared temperature measurement, your manual should list common epsilon values
     

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