Good Air Compressor

Discussion in 'Garages, Workshops & Tools' started by Camaro414, Apr 17, 2014.

  1. Camaro414

    Camaro414 New Member

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    Apr 11, 2014
    Milwaukee, WI
    Looking for a good compressor for full restorations. For Air tools, Cutting, Grinding, Spray Painting(a must), etc.. Something along $400-600 USD. Thanks;)
     
  2. Gary S

    Gary S Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

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    Apr 14, 1999
    Bismarck, North Dakota
    I think you might need to spend a bit more than that unless you find a good used one. Grinding, cutting, and painting require lots of CFM, and you won't get a lot of CFM until you get into the larger size compressors.
    None of the 120v compressors can deliver much more than 5-6 CFM. For big jobs, you want 15+ CFM at 90-100psi. To get to that level, you need a true 5hp 240v compressor. This size compressors usually run $800-$1500 new, but you might find a really good deal on a used one at the price range you are looking at spending.
    And, you will need to put in a dedicated 240v circuit to power a compressor this size, so plan on spending a bit more money there.
     
  3. Camaro414

    Camaro414 New Member

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    0
    Apr 11, 2014
    Milwaukee, WI
    I'm kind of on a budget here. http://www.aircompressorsdirect.com/Puma-PK6060V-Air-Compressor/p591.html
     
  4. Gary S

    Gary S Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

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    Apr 14, 1999
    Bismarck, North Dakota
    That one should handle painting just fine. Most paint guns don't take a ton of air. Grinding and cutting might drain it so you end up waiting. Most die grinders are rated at 4-8 cfm in their instruction manuals. That rating is running them in free air with no load on them. Once you put them to the metal and expect them to cut or grind, they take 2-3x their rated amount of air, so you can empty a smaller compressor quite fast if it can't deliver 15-20 cfm.
     
  5. Happy_Dan

    Happy_Dan Veteran Member

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    Sep 13, 2013
    Litchfield, NH
    Agree with Gary completely. I had a 20 gal Craftsman and I tried to get by with it but it was hopeless. My sandblaster especially was near useless. I bought an 80 Gal Ingersoll Rand and WOW, what a difference.
     
  6. jroach

    jroach Veteran Member

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    Apr 9, 2007
    petersburg MI
    i have a 60 gallon campbell hausfield(cheap version of IR) barely keeps up. using a die grinder, it will kick on catch up and kick back off. but it runs a long time before it catches up. but its enough that i can keep working. i think they run around 6-8 hundred dollars.
     
  7. CorkyE

    CorkyE Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Nov 4, 2004
    Ringgold, GA
    I have the same thing (because my neighbor gave it to me) and it does well with impact wrenches, etc but really struggles on free flowing tools such as die grinders. It's really limited on my blasting cabinet. But - I don't make my living off this equipment, so I can tolerate the delay.
     
  8. night rider

    night rider Veteran Member

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    Aug 6, 2002
    Bremen, Ga
    I recommend the ingersall rand 60 gal 230 volt compressor. I have had mine for over 10 years with no trouble at all from it. 11.3 cfm @ 90 psi.
     
  9. 71flh

    71flh Veteran Member

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    Jun 1, 2010
    DFW
    If you want more compressor for less money, buy used. I'll bet there are 10 on the local craigslist right now.

    Once you have a compressor, you'll want a bigger one. :)

    The compressor is just step one. Next is air line (not hose), filters and dryers. Then you get to tools and hose.
     
  10. Gary S

    Gary S Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

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    Apr 14, 1999
    Bismarck, North Dakota
    Tank size doesn't count for much. What is the CFM of the pump at 100psi? That is what matters.
    Putting a big tank on a small compressor is like putting a 100gallon gas tank on a Honda Civic. It doesn't make it faster.
     

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