Fisher Body

Discussion in 'Camaro Questions' started by iraqivet, Oct 19, 2016.

  1. iraqivet

    iraqivet Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    379
    6
    Nov 7, 2012
    Hobart, Indiana
    So with some time on my hands due to an injury, I've been looking up history on the second generation Camaro, especially my '79 Z-28. I have the assembly book, RPO and COPO codes, Camaro options from the GM heritage collection and general searches. So I have a project Norwood Z-28. As I understand it, Fisher Body built the body, applied the paint, decals, and installed the interior. So what did the GM employees do at Norwood? Did they just mate engines and axles? Did the camaro start it's life at one plant and finished at Norwood? I know GM owned a huge chunk of Fisher Body, so was Norwood a previous Fisher plant than renamed? I would like to know who or whom assembled our cars. It seems since Fisher had their own numbering system added to a trim tag, they ran the production. I know VIN and Build sheets trump trim tags, but Norwood left the build sheets out unlike Van Guys (so I am told). My Z-28 has a 73A color code for the Z-28 stripes. According to GM heritage, this stripe covers red or orange stripes for the car and has an RPO for each color. No build sheet, no RPO for the correct stripe color. So unless someone has another way to solve this mystery (car was stripped down and repainted by PO) I have no idea on which stripes to apply. Maybe when I'm 70 I won't be able to drive but I can tell you all about 1979 Camaros! Thanks. ( I should have been a detective).
     
  2. twozs

    twozs Veteran Member

    8,418
    78
    Aug 5, 1999
    hopewell jct ny
    By 79 ( actually well before ) GM merged with fisher body and became GMAD ( General Motors assembly division ) and everybody got paid by gmad . At GMAD Tarrytown where I worked , the old timers would still call the body / paint shops Fisher body and the other side Chevrolet . In 85 were were regrouped as CPC Tarrytown ( Chevrolet Pontiac Canada group) . It was all 1 plant . Just 2 different paychecks so you understand the confusion. Old school was body , paint and hard trim was fisher and soft trim ( which includes the cushion room ) , chassis and final line was the division that built the car . Under this system Tarrytown built Chevy trucks and full sized Chevrolet passenger cars. Under this system , plants only ran one manufacturer. The GMAD system we ran body styles. We ran X body's which was Nova , Phonix , and Skylark . we did not run the Omega as there were 4 other plants running X bodies . We also ran B bodies and the trans van at the end .
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2016
  3. l16pilot

    l16pilot Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    1,475
    54
    Dec 13, 2004
    Hurlock, MD, USA
    Get a copy of Phil Borris' book "Echoes of Norwood"....it's an interesting read of the history of the Norwood Ohio plant and goes into very good detail on the production process, Fisher vs GM and the GMAD organization described by twozs. www.norwoodassemblyplant.com
     
  4. iraqivet

    iraqivet Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    379
    6
    Nov 7, 2012
    Hobart, Indiana
    Is there any way to determine which stripes would be used on my 1979 Z-28? I know VIN and Build sheets trump trim tags, but Norwood left the build sheets out unlike Van Guys (so I am told). My Z-28 has a 73A color code for the Z-28 stripes. According to GM heritage, this stripe covers red or orange stripes for the car and has an RPO for each color. No build sheet, no RPO for the correct stripe color.
     
  5. iraqivet

    iraqivet Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    379
    6
    Nov 7, 2012
    Hobart, Indiana
    Purchased the book, thanks for the recommendation. It is a very interesting read and I'm only up to the 1950's. Cringed when I glanced through the book and saw the bodies being crushed. a lot of useful information.
     
  6. l16pilot

    l16pilot Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    1,475
    54
    Dec 13, 2004
    Hurlock, MD, USA
    Glad you enjoy it....for me, it gave me a much better appreciation for how these cars were assembled which explains a lot about the peculiarities for each car.
     

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