Coldest temp you have raced in?

Discussion in 'Competition Camaros' started by Blown Camaro, Jan 5, 2018.

  1. Blown Camaro

    Blown Camaro American by birth, drag racer by choice

    1,199
    138
    Dec 13, 2009
    Deltona, FL
    What is the coldest temp you have drag raced in? For me it was 40 degrees. The car was on a 31x13.5 slick and hooked just fine. Tomorrow I have a race and it is supposed to be 31 degrees and I am on a small drag radial. Wondering if I should chance this? You guys have any luck hooking drag radials in freezing temps?
     
  2. muscl car

    muscl car Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    Went to a New Years wknd Summit Racing bracket series race at Auto club dragway in Fontana Ca 8 years ago . It was 28° when the gates opened and the warmest it got was 38° at noontime
     
  3. mrdragster1970

    mrdragster1970 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    .


    Complete disaster for me at 40*.
    10" tire 8 second car, made 3-4 aborted runs and went home.

    I know slow guys have made the runs of their life, but I won't risk it any more, especially with the Pro-Mod.
    50* when I wake up and sunny conditions expected and I might take the risk, but any clouds or moisture possible no way.
    The groove is tiny, traction is compromised, hard to work, everyone is miserable, no thanks, I'll stay home sitting on my ass!!!!

    Good luck & be safe!!!!


    .
     
  4. SRGN

    SRGN Veteran Member

    534
    170
    Feb 20, 2009
    Central NJ
    I've run season openers and T&T where the temps were around 30. Stay in the middle of your staging lane so someone else can put some rubber down. Try to get in line with the slick cars if you can. Don't get out of the groove. Watch your tire pressure as it will initially be lower due to ambient temps, but will come up after the burn out. Pull a couple degrees of timing out down low so you don't hit the tire as hard. If you can, take out the timing 1k RPM below your converter stall speed to about 1k RPM over stall speed. Add a little fuel on top of the RPM range to compensate for the cooler air.
     
  5. Blown Camaro

    Blown Camaro American by birth, drag racer by choice

    1,199
    138
    Dec 13, 2009
    Deltona, FL
    After reading all of this, and my friends backing out, I am done too. Not worth putting my car into the wall for a "Glory Pass". It's 6:30am, 32 degrees and still dropping.

    Thanks for responding, guys.

    I will probably still go down there and watch some faster cars launch. Maybe I can learn something in case I move up North!
     
  6. Blown Camaro

    Blown Camaro American by birth, drag racer by choice

    1,199
    138
    Dec 13, 2009
    Deltona, FL
    One more question:

    Let's suppose I WAS going to run today and the car is correctly jetted for 80 degree 40 percent humidity. I run two Demon carbs on a 6-71. What changes would you make for 32 degrees 45 percent humidity?
     
  7. xten

    xten Veteran Member

    1,865
    884
    Sep 24, 2014
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    I would take SRGN's advise. We were at the track at night, and it dropped 20° quick. We were sitting in our tow vehicles with the heat on between rounds. The only other thing I can suggest is see what the track temp is. Make sure you stage as quickly as possible after your burnout to keep as much heat in the radials as you can, and hope the other lane does the same. When I staged, the other lane was fiddle-farting around, and the tires cooled off, and we both blew the tires off. That was enough for me.
     
  8. SRGN

    SRGN Veteran Member

    534
    170
    Feb 20, 2009
    Central NJ
    Cold temp = increased air density, especially if near sea level with a high barometer. Boost will probably be 1-2 PSI higher with no other changes. I would anticipate going up at least 2 jet sizes, with a wideband running on my qualifying pass to make sure I was good. If no wideband, go 3 sizes to make sure it is safe. Not going to hurt it running a little rich, go lean and its going to hurt something. If it is down a little on power it will help it get down the track anyway. I have an old TAG weather station that helps a lot. Sometimes cooler air with a low barometer isn't as good as warmer air with a high barometer, but you need data to make a decision. If you have extra money in your pocket and bracket race often, a Performaire weather station or similar is a great investment. Not so worth it if you don't race often. I was top 10 in points for 10 years, including top 5 for the last 5 I raced brackets. Points season lasted till October, log your data and you can see what different conditions do to your car. I had a IR temp gun I would check track temp with sometimes lol
     
    Blown Camaro likes this.

Share This Page