Best air line water separator/ regulator combo?

Discussion in 'Garages, Workshops & Tools' started by 69TAPoser, Sep 20, 2011.

  1. 69TAPoser

    69TAPoser Veteran Member

    672
    0
    Nov 24, 2008
    Windham, NH
    What are you guys using and have had good luck with? I plan on trying my hand at spraying, so I need something that is effective at removing the water.

    Thanks,

    Phil
     
  2. motown 454

    motown 454 Veteran Member

    404
    1
    Feb 4, 2008
    Ma.
    Hi phil I don't know the answer but good to see you online. I need to know this answer too.
    Oh by the way I got the car home :cool:
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2011
  3. 71flh

    71flh Veteran Member

    916
    14
    Jun 1, 2010
    DFW
    How much, how long and what kind of line is between the tank and separator? The key is getting the air cooled so the separator works.

    If its right next to the tank, the water will just blow right past the separator in the hot air.
     
  4. 69TAPoser

    69TAPoser Veteran Member

    672
    0
    Nov 24, 2008
    Windham, NH
    I just bought a used compressor, it is a 60 gallon, 6.5hp. I am just now picking the location for the tank in my garage, so routing of the line/filter is fairly flexible. I was considering a water/debris filter with a regulator like this:

    [​IMG]

    http://www.eastwood.com/ew-filter-separator-regulator-system.html

    Here is the tank and area:

    [​IMG]

    Thoughts?

    Phil
     
  5. grzewnicki

    grzewnicki Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member


    All these years and I never knew this. I'm taking my extra 50 foot air hose (coiled up) and putting that between my compressor and seperator. Think that will help? I mean most of us have a garage and the compressor is "RIGHT" there with no real plumbing of any length to get the cooling effect you are talking about.

    Just found this link on the web, air hose as an extension won't help, it actually seems to hurt:

    http://www.tptools.com/statictext/airline-piping-diagram.pdf
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2011
  6. woody80z28

    woody80z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    5,438
    13
    Sep 8, 2004
    walton, ny usa
    I've been unhappy with my Campbell Hausfeld water trap and dryer. I wonder if this is part of the problem...that stuff is only a few feet from the compressor.
     
  7. 69TAPoser

    69TAPoser Veteran Member

    672
    0
    Nov 24, 2008
    Windham, NH
    Wow, great diagram. It appears that the length of piping does help cool the air and reduce moisture...long lengths of hose do not. The "risers" seem critical. Thats a LOT of hardware. It's exactly what I am trying to do, I will need to price it out.

    Thanks,

    Phil
     
  8. olstyle

    olstyle Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    8,649
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    Jan 27, 2008
    Crestwood IL.
    Here is a few pics of the air lines I made. It is about 10 feet from the compressor. Have not gotten any water in the lines since I built this. You can see it on the wall. Best pics of the air lines I got while building a new work bench. The lines are all 1/2" galvanized pipe.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Kamikaze

    Kamikaze Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    Olstyle's system is very effective at "trapping" the condensation of water and keeping it where it can be drained.

    Hard piping over a long distance from the compressor is necessary to allow the air to cool and let the moisture drop out of the compressed air. Flexible hoses do not allow condensation to form as freely as Black Pipe or Copper tubing.

    The hard lines should be sloped or dropped before the outlet, so you can create a trap and drain to remove it before it goes into your hose.

    A 3-stage filter system should be manditory for spraying paint and it should be away from the compressor but before the hose. 3-stage systems typically consist of a large particle filter, a coalesing filter and a dessicant filter to get every possible bit of moisture and particles out of the air. Expect to pay over $150.00 for a cheap 3-stage system but you will be better off spending more for a Sharpe or DeVillbiss unit at nearly $300.00.

    If you do any painting, you should also include a disposable filter at the gun and replace them between uses. They are cheap additional insurance.

    Always drain your compressor between uses! The build-up inside also attracts other particles and prevents rust formation.

    Also suggest you add an additional filter / water trap before your blast cabinet and any additional outlets you plumb in your garage.
     
  10. 71flh

    71flh Veteran Member

    916
    14
    Jun 1, 2010
    DFW
    Maybe my choice of words was bad. I meant the length of the line to the dryer, not where it is physically.

    Olstyle, How does the water that can collect in the U under the bench get drained?
     

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