1LE rotor swap

Discussion in 'Suspension, Steering, Brake & Wheel Topics' started by Jeep43, Jun 6, 2019.

  1. badazz81z28

    badazz81z28 Veteran Member

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    Just coming back to this....what’s disappointing about the brake? In all honestly with normal daily driving stock brakes in mechanical top shape work fine. Performance driving, they may overheat and become less effective. I would argue even the 1LE swap is still going to give you old generation braking power not suitable for modern performance. For high performance use, you need a larger rotor, large caliper with good pads AND a master cylinder to bring it all together.

    If your stock brakes lack for a stock like application. I would look into issues with the master cylinder, crud or rust in the brake lines causing fluid transfer issues.
     
  2. Jeep43

    Jeep43 Veteran Member

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    Entire system is brand new. I realize that brake technology has come a long way but I am trying to maintain a stock like appearance and still want to use the factory 5 spokes, so if I can sneak a little more brake in there I'll do it.
     
  3. dale68z

    dale68z Veteran Member

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    I ran 1LE rotors, dtc 30 pads, 1990 s-10 master cylinder with no prop/ combo valve on my 71. I ran the hell out of it on road courses. Excellent stopping power. Rotors and pads were good for 6 track days, and I had to swap pads right and left every track day. I also packed the wheel bearings every other track day with jt6 wheel bearing grease. I had brake coolers ducted to the center of the front rotors. After getting off track, I would move the car a couple of times in about 10 minutes to let the rotors cool evenly. If I didn't replace the rotors, they would crack in about 8-10 track days.
    I changed to 13"x 1.25" rotors with wilwood 4 piston calipers, BP 40 or 30 pad, still using the s-10 master and really didn't feel there was much better stopping power. It was better, but not worth the money spent. Still had the taper pad wear Still had to do the pad flip, but packed bearings when I replaced pads, again about 6 track days. Rotors lasted 3 times longer (but cost 3 times more). Never had one crack.
    Both setups had excellent pedal feel.
    I was going to put the 1le on my 73, but just went with bp20 pads. Much better stopping than the stock type pad.
     
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  4. Jeep43

    Jeep43 Veteran Member

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    Current setup up front is stock with cross drilled front rotors and HPS pads with stock calipers. All new lines and hoses. Rear is stock size porterfield shoes and new alum drums. I'm using a stock master on a repop booster with a combo valve with the proportioning and metering portions deleted and a wilwood prop valve in the rear line.

    With a controlled brake apply, brakes seem fine. A quick hard apply and they are lacking. I'm wondering if the repop booster is not operating properly. I'm going to replace it with a reman.
     
  5. Jeep43

    Jeep43 Veteran Member

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    Another thing, is there a way to positively ID the spindles? The ones I got look right I guess, they have what I think are abs sensor holes. But no full casting / forging number.
     
  6. badazz81z28

    badazz81z28 Veteran Member

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    B-body spindles have a part number on them...it even tells you “RH” “LH”. It’s on the back.
     
  7. dale68z

    dale68z Veteran Member

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  8. G72Zed

    G72Zed Veteran Member

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    Thanks for sharing dale68z, very interesting there was no real big brake performance difference in going from 12" 1LE rotors to the 13" rotors, marketing would lead you to think that bigger is always better.
     
  9. 79T/Aman

    79T/Aman Veteran Member NastyZ28 Sponsor NazstyZ28 Sponsor Lifetime Gold Member

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    Dale you really should tell how hard you are on brakes HaHa :)
    If you do the math the stock calipers have as much or more clamping force than many after market calipers, the trouble with the stock calipers is the pressure on the pad is not as even and under racing high heat the pad deforms on the outer end s where there is no support (Dale warped the steel pad plate) as Dale said the rotor is what will last longer, for a street car bigger brakes is mostly for show yes bigger rotors will have more braking leverage but also weigh more and those 14" rotors are just for bragging rights, you now have to over come the centrifugal energy of 4 massive flywheels, you run into a situation of diminishing results frankly anything over 13" becomes counter productive.

    And before someone jumps and says "Corvettes use 14" brakes" well GM is in the business of SELLING a product, but that is also why they offer 14" brakes in carbon because engineers aren't stupid.
     
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  10. badazz81z28

    badazz81z28 Veteran Member

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    All things being equal a 13” set-up is better then a 12” or 11”. However that being said, that doesn’t mean a smaller set-up will work for your application.

    A bigger rotor can accommodate more pad surface which equates to more friction = stopping power. A larger rotor also can take more heat.


     

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