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Old 02-27-2013, 10:06:26 AM   #1
CDesperado
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Steel vs Aluminum Fuel Lines

One of the guys at the shop just told me they want to use aluminum rather than steel fuel lines because it "bends easier" - but off a quick Google search I see several posts saying not to do this.

Can anyone here provide me with more input? I may need to call the shop and put the kibosh on this idea. I asked if there was any advantage/ disadvantage and was told there isn't, but I question everything.

I'm using an MSD Atomic EFI with a return line.

Thanks for any input.
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:12:58 AM   #2
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Aluminum is lighter but heat transfers easier in aluminum than steel and it will also fatigue if used where vibrations may effect it. Not to sure about flaring aluminum lines either, looks like it would work harden and eventually leak at the flare. May want to look into this a bit further before jumping in with aluminum.
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:19:07 AM   #3
CDesperado
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I'm not really too keen on aluminum based on a few posts that I have read.

In particular, this post
http://www.nastyz28.com/forum/showthread.php?t=195933
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:21:37 AM   #4
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IMO not on a street car. From that thread:
Quote:
Originally Posted by BonzoHansen
I respectfully disagree. It's not just vibration. Puncture resistance is just as important. OE lines are steel, often with stone guard, for a reason. The only unprotected lines under my wife's Pilot are aluminum coolant lines for the rear console heater core. Even the AC lines have protection plates over them. Not these damn lines. Looks like your pic but more like AN10. One piece of boucing road debrid tore them wide open. After that experience I'd never run unprotected aluminum lines, let alone fuel lines.
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:11:02 AM   #5
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one of the main problems people experience with aluminum lines is thier failure to properly support it. You cannot have a 3 ft span between clamps on aluminum (nor steel for that matter) but if you are swapping from 5/16 steel to 3/8 aluminum consider ADDING at least 2 MORE insulated clamps in-between each of the factory clamps. Stone shielding is obviously a beneift and DON'T USE the BATTERY CABLE as a rock gaurd for the fuel line.
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Old 02-27-2013, 12:40:05 PM   #6
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What about using braided lines? I am about to run lines for my car and am going through the same dilemma and have thought about using a braided line from the tank to the fuel rail.
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Old 02-27-2013, 01:00:13 PM   #7
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I've seen a little bit of information on those, but not enough to determine if that is the direction I should go. It may not be the best option for me since I'm running EFI.

I honestly don't know what direction to go, other than that I have seen numerous forums recommending against using aluminum for street cars.
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Old 02-27-2013, 01:06:20 PM   #8
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I hand bent 3/8 stainless hard line, if I can do it you can do it. Ease of bending isn't worth using a weaker metal, to me.

I just used a cheap 3-stepped size auto parts store tubing bender - I stuck it in a pipe I stuck in the ground, and used a little jack handle to extend the handle. Worked fine. Use lubricant when bending.



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Old 02-27-2013, 01:25:55 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryeguy2006a
What about using braided lines? I am about to run lines for my car and am going through the same dilemma and have thought about using a braided line from the tank to the fuel rail.
It needs to be the teflon lined variety of high pressure braided hose to hold up to EFI and today's fuels....and it doesn't let the fuel smell through like the regular braided hose does.
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Old 02-27-2013, 02:59:49 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Wright
It needs to be the teflon lined variety of high pressure braided hose to hold up to EFI and today's fuels....and it doesn't let the fuel smell through like the regular braided hose does.


You can use any Fuel Injection type of braided hose. It doesn't have to be PTFE, but like mentioned it will cut down on the gas eating through the lines. PTFE is also not very flexible and VERY expensive.

I will tell you, even though lowest cost hose is the quickest and simple solution, but its all the most expensive!

I highly suggest buying steel line. Only use hose from the frame to the tank and frame to the fuel rail. Never use aluminum for a street car. Rock and debri can easily puncture it and you will be having a bad day when gallons of gas goes everywhere (That's if it doesn't com bust first).
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Old 02-27-2013, 03:42:56 PM   #11
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I think I am going to go with the 3/8 steel line, but am waiting to talk to MSD first.
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Old 02-27-2013, 07:55:13 PM   #12
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If you decide to go with braided line, let me know, my wife works for Aeroquip and I can get you a deal....shipping might suck though.
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:47:46 PM   #13
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Ok, cool. Thanks man! I'll dig into this more on Friday. All I know right now is that I am definitely not doing aluminum lines.
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:51:39 PM   #14
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Stainless is the real MF'r to bend and flare.

Steel is the more desirable in classic cars. But I'm using modern Nylon fuel
lines in my 442. Almost all modern vehicles with no frames below are using
Nylon fuel lines in them for the past decade +.

I don't know where I'd route them under the Camaro , I'd have to look but
if there's passages it's another option. I just haven't looked.
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Old 02-27-2013, 09:57:17 PM   #15
ryeguy2006a
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Protour-Camaro
You can use any Fuel Injection type of braided hose. It doesn't have to be PTFE, but like mentioned it will cut down on the gas eating through the lines. PTFE is also not very flexible and VERY expensive.

I will tell you, even though lowest cost hose is the quickest and simple solution, but its all the most expensive!

I highly suggest buying steel line. Only use hose from the frame to the tank and frame to the fuel rail. Never use aluminum for a street car. Rock and debri can easily puncture it and you will be having a bad day when gallons of gas goes everywhere (That's if it doesn't com bust first).
I currently have the steel lines in my car, but I thought I read somewhere that compression fittings weren't rated for the 60 psi that LS motors run at? Is there any huge negatives to running all AN lines?
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