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Old 05-16-2012, 07:21:53 PM   #1
bfmgoalie
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Frozen Soda

I received this small portable fridge from a friend's daughter who just graduated college. I loaded it up with soda. When I took out the first can, popped it open and took a drink, it was nice and cold. I put the can down and about 5 minutes later, I went to take a drink and the soda was slushy/frozen. How would that happen? Something to do with the amount of oxygen the soda is now exposed to?

I love to learn things everyday; hence why I ask the question. Thanks
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Old 05-16-2012, 07:28:37 PM   #2
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Have this happen all the time when deployed. Pull a cold water from the fridge, shake it up real quick and it turns to ice. My interpreters couldnt believe it.
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Old 05-16-2012, 07:29:34 PM   #3
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Known as "Flash Freezing" my daughter did a science project on this. Pretty cool.



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Old 05-16-2012, 07:36:16 PM   #4
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Great video!! Is the bottle top open?
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Old 05-16-2012, 07:38:13 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bfmgoalie
Great video!! Is the bottle top open?

It can stay closed. Basicly the water or fluid is just about to freeze when you take it out. The movement of the bottle causes the molecules to hit which in turn causes the freezing. (thats what I just read)
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Old 05-16-2012, 07:40:02 PM   #6
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The pressure in the can prevents ice formation at its "normal" temp.
When you pop the top... It freezes.

A bottle of beer in the freezer will do the same thing if you take it out at the right temp.
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Old 05-16-2012, 07:41:32 PM   #7
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Quote:

A bottle of beer in the freezer will do the same thing if you take it out at the right temp.

Yeah I have had this happen to me . Oh ,Yeah
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Old 05-16-2012, 07:43:46 PM   #8
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Mmmm, slushie beer, sign me up!
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Old 05-16-2012, 09:08:35 PM   #9
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I beleave its because the CO2 can lower the freezing point of a beverage, you pop the top and the CO2 escapes and the freezing point will be raised back to the normal temp water freezes (32*f).

Ive never heard of pressure preventing a liquid from becoming a solid, solids and liquids can not be compressed like a gas so pressure should have little to no effect.
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Old 05-16-2012, 09:20:17 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joekool
I beleave its because the CO2 can lower the freezing point of a beverage, you pop the top and the CO2 escapes and the freezing point will be raised back to the normal temp water freezes (32*f).

Ive never heard of pressure preventing a liquid from becoming a solid, solids and liquids can not be compressed like a gas so pressure should have little to no effect.
It's the pressure. Water (which your soda and beer are both mostly composed of) is unusual in that the solid, unlike most materials, takes up more volume than the liquid, so the higher pressure tends to keep it liquid even at sub freezing temps. Pop the top, release the pressure, and the super cooled water freezes. In the case of pop the sugar content keeps it from freezing solid easily so you get slush.

Edit: both liquids and solids can be compressed, just not as easily as most gasses.
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Old 05-16-2012, 09:26:35 PM   #11
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I had to go digging for an answer to this one.

You're right!
I found a pretty good scientific explanation.
It seems the loss of CO2 to the solution (due to pressure release) is the biggest factor.
Not just the pressure itself.

Quote:
The dissolved carbon dioxide

At first, I thought that the answer to this question was obvious. However, after further thought and investigation, I realized that there are several processes at work all of varying degrees of significance. The tough thing to decide is probably which process is most significant.

A few important facts to note in analyzing this problem.

1. Beer bottles/cans and soda bottles/cans are pressurized.
2. They all contain solutes in the solvent, water.
3. Both contain the solute CO2, carbon dioxide.

Most solutes will lower the freezing point of solvents when they are combined into a homogeneous mixture. In this case, we have carbon dioxide, the solute, dissolved into water, the solvent. Dissolved carbon dioxide in water will, in fact, lower the freezing point of the solution below 0 C.

For beer, there are a few more solutes than carbon dioxide such as alcohol and various salts, but they all act to lower the freezing point of the solution relative to that of water. I read that -0.42 * (percent alcohol by volume) degrees C is accurate. That is, 1 percent of alcohol dissolved in water will lower the freezing point by 0.42 C and the relationship is linear. (I won't really back this up because I didn't get access to the journal article that finds this. The information is out there, though.)

That said, the pressurized bottles and cans keep the carbon dioxide in the solution as the bottles and cans are cooled. This in turn lowers the freezing point of the solution below that of water 0 C. For cream soda, it's about -10 C. If the freezer is cool enough, this solution will freeze too. But since most household freezers are kept around 0 C, this tends not to happen. When the bottle is opened, there is a pressure differential between the outside environment and inside the bottle. Typically bottles are pressurized around 5 atmospheres (http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasc.../gen01625.htm). So as the pressure inside the bottle equilibrates with the environment, it lowers, thereby releasing carbon dioxide from the solution.* This has a three-pronged effect.

(1) First dissolved solute leaves the solution thereby *raising* its freezing temperature.

(2) Second the gaseous bubbles of carbon dioxide forming in the solution expand adiabatically (to very good approximation) and under a constant pressure for the solution. Therefore, the escaping gas bubbles temperatures increase, while the solution cools. (T_initial/V_initial = T_final/V_final)

(3) Thirdly, the escaping bubbles agitate the now supercooled solution providing for nucleation sites for crystal growth
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Old 05-16-2012, 09:59:47 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwild1967
It's the pressure. Water (which your soda and beer are both mostly composed of) is unusual in that the solid, unlike most materials, takes up more volume than the liquid, so the higher pressure tends to keep it liquid even at sub freezing temps. Pop the top, release the pressure, and the super cooled water freezes. In the case of pop the sugar content keeps it from freezing solid easily so you get slush.

Edit: both liquids and solids can be compressed, just not as easily as most gasses.

I can see your point but when water is mixed with other substances the freezing point will change, salt for instance lowers the freezing point of sea water. CO2, sugar, sodium and other ingredients will affect the freezing point, open the can and the CO2 will escape (that fiz you hear) or lose suspension in the liquid (the bubbles that keep rising for awhile) thus changing the freezing point. You can also make the fluid freeze if you shake the can or bottle before opening because some of the CO2 will temporarily release from the fluid thus changing the freezing point. The pressure of the container only has an effect on the freeze point such that it prevents the CO2 from seperating from the fluid, it has no effect other then that. If the pressure had an effect like you stated, shaking the can or bottle wouldnt have any effect at all.

You can marginally compress a fluid but its so miniscule and the pressure required so high that a soda can or bottle will never beable to hold that much pressure.
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:14:53 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bfmgoalie
I went to take a drink and the soda was slushy/frozen. How would that happen?
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:16:11 PM   #14
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:46:39 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by A71SS4ME
Well, according to this we are all wrong.
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