View Full Version : Crank gear removal


CamaroMan79
01-28-2010, 02:55:34 PM
Whats the best way to take a crank gear off a sbc crank? I tired putting apuller on there and my puller center bolt ended up snapping off. Howabout applying some heat to it?

btw this is in an assembled engine.

Cardinal
01-28-2010, 03:20:14 PM
Are you replacing the gear or trying to save it?

Replacing/removing a stock link belt timing chain crank gear: put a clean lint free rag under the crank to prevent the gear from falling into the pan. Take a good chisel (1/2" or wider will do) put it between the teeth of the gear near where the keyway on the crank is. WACK the chisel with a hammer and the gear will split in half. Done.

If it's a double roller chain timing chain crank gear, you should be able to put a split puller on it the pull it off like this one: http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00999046000P?keyword=pulley+puller

hhott71
01-28-2010, 04:49:51 PM
You need a HD Vacuum cleaner.........

OR Use a Gear Puller.

COPO
01-28-2010, 04:56:38 PM
I used a 3 claw arm tool that comes with a centre pointed post to remove mine and it came off easy.
A new one was going on anyways along with a cam sprocket and chain.

It looked something like this I borrowed from my engine builder.

http://static.summitracing.com/global/images/prod/large/otc-465_w.jpg

wiseryder
01-28-2010, 05:29:42 PM
Are you replacing the gear or trying to save it?

. Take a good chisel (1/2" or wider will do) put it between the teeth of the gear near where the keyway on the crank is. WACK the chisel with a hammer and the gear will split in half. Done.



Seriously???
I've never heard of that :eek:

deputyrob
01-28-2010, 07:57:25 PM
three finger gear puller works every time..just like COPO posted. get a harbor freight speacial and ur good to go.

badazz81z28
01-28-2010, 08:25:59 PM
Are you replacing the gear or trying to save it?

Replacing/removing a stock link belt timing chain crank gear: put a clean lint free rag under the crank to prevent the gear from falling into the pan. Take a good chisel (1/2" or wider will do) put it between the teeth of the gear near where the keyway on the crank is. WACK the chisel with a hammer and the gear will split in half. Done.

If it's a double roller chain timing chain crank gear, you should be able to put a split puller on it the pull it off like this one: http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00999046000P?keyword=pulley+puller


That will not work if you have a steel gear. I have seen some small blocks with what looks like a plastic gear and that procedure would probably work.

IMHO, A little heat and the proper tool will get the job dont and not damage anything.

pdq67
01-29-2010, 02:42:47 PM
"Originally Posted by Cardinal
Are you replacing the gear or trying to save it?

. Take a good chisel (1/2" or wider will do) put it between the teeth of the gear near where the keyway on the crank is. WACK the chisel with a hammer and the gear will split in half. Done.

Seriously???
I've never heard of that."

Suckers are powder gears and will snap in a NYM doing this! And be careful you don't break the cast crank's snout off while doing this!!

Now, steel gears, NO!

Pull them off!!

pdq67

COPO
01-29-2010, 03:00:45 PM
^^ and hope you don't get a nice gouge in the crank. Get the proper tool and don't be cheap about it or Murphy's Law will kick in then you'll be :whine: .

pdq67
01-29-2010, 03:09:15 PM
Use a dull 1" wide cold chisel set at the side of the key-way and a 3 pound Ford tool and go.

No problems at all and I've done in many times!

pdq67

wiseryder
01-29-2010, 05:24:28 PM
[QUOTE=pdq67 a 3 pound Ford wrench and go.

No problems at all and I've done in many times!

pdq67[/QUOTE]

Fixed it for ya ,lol

COPO
01-29-2010, 05:37:46 PM
^^ wobbly crank after the job?

pdq67
01-29-2010, 06:05:43 PM
I can crack a powder crank timing gear easy w/ a 6 oz. ball-pein hammer so I doubt if I will tweek the crank snout.

Done it......

pdq67

77wolf10.85
01-29-2010, 06:32:56 PM
Seems I've read that some guys drill a hole in them before they hit them. Seems slow to me.

I just use a puller with a swivel end and some method of protecting the crank threads. Impact on the puller and it's all done about the time you pull the trigger. They pull way easy.

Cardinal
01-29-2010, 07:36:20 PM
I've used the chisel method for removing hundreds of the link chain crank gears (which are probably powered metal) from all sizes of small block Chevys with ZERO damage to any of the crankshafts. A "medium" hit with a hammer on the chisel will split it very easily without doing any damage to the crank. BTW, I learned this method back in the 1960s when I couldn't afford a gear puller and before they came out with roller chain timing gear sets.

As for the double roller chain style crank gears, you HAVE TO use a gear puller to get them off.

AJ_72
01-30-2010, 12:04:55 AM
When using the hammer just be careful you don't whack your shaft.

jakeshoe
01-30-2010, 01:17:58 AM
I've used the chisel method for removing hundreds of the link chain crank gears (which are probably powered metal) from all sizes of small block Chevys with ZERO damage to any of the crankshafts. A "medium" hit with a hammer on the chisel will split it very easily without doing any damage to the crank. BTW, I learned this method back in the 1960s when I couldn't afford a gear puller and before they came out with roller chain timing gear sets.

As for the double roller chain style crank gears, you HAVE TO use a gear puller to get them off.

Yes,
This is a common trick known to many mechanics and machinists but of course our resident "experts" tell us it can't be done, or it will cause damage.

Cardinal,
You've probably built hundreds of engines, there are in reality on a handful of guys on this forum with that type of experience. Yet when we post something based on experience, the dumbazz types THINK they know something. It's pretty laughable.

A crankshafts sees the impact of an explosion on every rod journal hundreds of thousands of times in its usable lifespan, and we should be worried about one hammer impact?

pdq67
01-30-2010, 10:01:27 AM
The old time Mechanic's around town taught this pup how to do it back in the '60's too.

Just like using waterglass to seal a cracked head until you can get the money together to switch it out!

pdq67

kenny77
01-30-2010, 12:55:28 PM
Just like using waterglass to seal a cracked head until you can get the money together to switch it out!

pdq67

I think I better get out my 60's decoder ring.........

Cardinal
01-30-2010, 02:16:00 PM
Jake:

I worked with no modern tools for too long. Had to make do with what I had in the tool box or make a tool or make a tool what is wasn't made to do. I also learned from a lot of old timers that had more knowledge about being a mechanic in their little finger than most people have in their whole body.

I'm spoiled now that I have a garage with all the toys: two post lift, welders, REAL torches, concrete floor (instead of a dirt floor to loose parts into), benches, REAL tool boxes with REAL tools, HEAT in the garage, late/mill machine, drill press, belt sander, grinders, engine hoist & engine stands (which I MADE not store bought although I STILL have my come-a-long that pulled hundreds of engines over the years), etc.

Almost sixty years of knowledge bottled up in this old shell and I STILL learn something new every day. I have an open mind to new ideas. I still hope that my knowledge of the "old ways" is accepted.

jakeshoe
01-30-2010, 02:56:11 PM
Yeah,
It just amuses me when someone with MAYBE 3-4 engine builds (assembly only at that) under their belt tells an experienced mechanic that he "can't" do something, when the fact is, it's been done for a hundred years that way.

I would like to see some of these experts make a living working on cars for about a month, commission pay at a dealership.

Or a machine shop.
I would like to see them "press" a set of axle bearings on, or remove rear differential carrier bearings, etc

Most of them wouldn't know that a 3 or 4 jaw puller can actually keep you from pulling of a gear or pulley by making the object fit tighter on the shaft...

pdq67
01-30-2010, 03:58:51 PM
"Just like using "waterglass", (aka, sodium silicate, an industrial strength stop leak), to seal a "cracked head", (A CRACKED ENGINE CYLINDER HEAD!), until you can get the money together to "switch it out", (aka, install a good head)!

pdq67


I think I better get out my 60's decoder ring........."

There you go..

He, He!!

pdq67

77wolf10.85
01-30-2010, 04:09:17 PM
Yeah,

I would like to see them "press" a set of axle bearings on, or remove rear differential carrier bearings, etc


.


Jake, have you ever tried heating your roller bearings in oil? I have built a lot of screw compressors for oil field useage, and that's how we do our rollers. I have a fry daddy full of motor oil, 275 for a few minutes and they just go like nobodies business.

I tried it on an input shaft bearing on a little gm 3 cyl suzuki manual tranny once and it was so small it lost too much heat before I got it on the shaft. 2nd time I got my act together better and got it.

pdq67
01-30-2010, 04:16:32 PM
Way cool to know Tim and I love the little 3-banger Suzuki Jewel of a 1-L engine!!

Had a new 1987 Chevy Sprint ER and a new 2000 3-banger, 5-speed hatch Metro.

I would give $11,000 to be able to buy a new, 1987 Chevy Sprint ER el-strippo car like I bought back then for $6,300.

Suckers are that good a car by me..........................

I figure that GM talked them out of the SMALL CAR business b/c GM sure the hell couldn't/hell WOULDN'T compete so just get rid of the competition!!

F*** GM..

And after seeing how that NEW Camaro came apart, no way will I own one..............

pdq67

jakeshoe
01-30-2010, 04:23:33 PM
When I was 12 yrs old I was rebuilding the motors in my dirt bikes. 80cc or 125 cc 2 strokes with 6 speed transmission.

We always froze the crankshaft and oven heated the bearings to install the main bearings on the crank, and then heated the cases to install over the bearings.

It's a one shot deal, better have your stuff together before you pull the case out of the oven because once you drop it on, if you left something out, you get to press it back apart and try again.

I freeze sleeves before I install them in a cylinder block, but you still have to "press" them in.

Thermal expansion and contraction is a good method but not something you are going to use in a production repair environment very often.
We don't press carrier bearings off a diff carrier unless we have to save them, they get CUT off and they method we use to cut them off is similar to what Cardinal posted. Cut a groove with a cut off saw, and then smack it with a cold chisel. Slide it off.

I don't know where some of these idiots come off telling a mechanic with nearly 50 yrs of experience (Cardinal) that he "can't" use a method he's used hundreds of times, or that it won't work, but at the same time they ask hundreds of redundant questions concerning basic stuff here. :screwup:

77wolf10.85
01-30-2010, 04:27:19 PM
I bought an 87, about 5 or 6 years ago. Pretty cool story. It was at a shop here in my small town, and I spotted it w/ a 4sale sign and just watched it almost 6 months. One day I told Deb, OK I'm going to go buy that funky little red car for 50%. Shop owner had a $1500 sign on it, and I just walked up and said "I'll give you what you have in it, no more no less but you have to show me the ticket" ,,,,,,,,,,, he said "deal" and pulled out an $800 engine overhaul invoice. I peeled 8 of em off and grabbed the keys. Lots more stories on that little sweetheart. I made a profit on the car eventually, after letting my boy try to kill it in the oilfield driving to rigs. Sold it to a little girl, just married and pregnant. Still see it every once ina while. 48 friggin mpg.

pdq67
01-31-2010, 10:45:10 AM
EPA rated the '87 Chevy Sprit ER at 71 mpg or so on their about 45 mph CAFE driving trace back then. I got 50 mpg running 70 to 75 mph commuting on the hwy for years and years!

He, He!!

Right, again, I would buy a new one for $11,000 in a NYM!!!

Sucker ran up to 85 mph and that was about it.

pdq67